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Research Papers: Internal Combustion Engines

Development of a Torsional Behavior Powertrain Model for Multiple Misfire Detection

[+] Author and Article Information
Fabrizio Ponti

DIEM, University of Bologna, Bologna 40136, Italy

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 130(2), 022803 (Feb 25, 2008) (13 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2770486 History: Received September 20, 2005; Revised July 13, 2007; Published February 25, 2008

Many methodologies have been developed in the past for misfire detection purposes based on the analysis of the instantaneous engine speed. The missing combustion is usually detected, thanks to the sudden engine speed decrease that takes place after a misfire event. Misfire detection and, in particular, cylinder isolation are nevertheless still a challenging issue for engines with a high number of cylinders, for engine operating conditions at low load or high engine speed, and for multiple misfire events. When a misfire event takes place, a torsional vibration is excited and shows up in the instantaneous engine speed wave form. If a multiple misfire occurs, this torsional vibration is excited more than once in a very short time interval. The interaction between these successive vibrations can generate false alarms or misdetection, and an increased complexity when dealing with cylinder isolation. This paper presents the development of a powertrain torsional behavior model in order to identify the effects of a misfire event on the instantaneous engine speed signal. The identified wave form has then been used to filter out the torsional vibration effects in order to enlighten the missing combustions even in the case of multiple misfire events. The model response is also used to speed up the setup process for the detection algorithm employed, thus evaluating, before running specific experimental tests on a test bench facility, the values for the threshold and the optimal setup of the procedure. The proposed algorithm is developed in this paper for an SI L4 engine; its application to other engine configurations is possible, as is also discussed in this paper.

Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Engine speed trend with Cylinder 1 misfiring (TDC of the misfiring cylinder is at 1080deg crankshaft angle). The engine is running at 3000rpm and 5.13bar BMEP.

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Figure 2

Complete drawing of the engine-load configuration considered in the paper

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Figure 3

Complete scheme of the engine-load model

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Figure 4

Firing, motoring, and combustion indicated torques

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Figure 5

Reciprocating torque at 3000rpm

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Figure 6

Engine speed variation during experimental test

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Figure 7

Engine speed oscillation amplitude and phase

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Figure 8

Engine speed oscillation amplitude and phase

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Figure 9

Amplitude and phase of the indicated torque second order component

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Figure 10

Amplitude and phase of the reciprocating torque second order component

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Figure 11

Experimental (black lines) and simulated (gray lines) order analysis

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Figure 12

Modal shape for the first three natural frequencies

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Figure 13

Experimental (gray line) and simulated (black line) engine speed for steady-state operating conditions

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Figure 14

Experimental (gray line) and simulated (black line) engine speed for misfiring operating conditions

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Figure 15

Misfire effect over engine speed

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Figure 16

Misfire effect over engine speed wave form

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Figure 17

Experimental (gray line) and simulated (black line) engine speed for multiple misfiring operating conditions (misfire patterns 1-3, 1-4, and 1-2)

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Figure 18

Misfire effect for different misfire patterns (misfire patterns 1-3, 1-4, and 1-2)

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Figure 19

Misfire effect for different misfire patterns

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Figure 20

Misfire effect of the second misfire of the multiple pattern

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Figure 21

Simplified model configuration

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Figure 22

Misfire effects over engine speed wave form at different speeds and loads

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Figure 23

Best sector definition (the angular values are reported with respect to the TDC of the corresponding cylinder)

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Figure 24

Theoretical and experimental threshold definition

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Figure 25

Misfire effects over LUi wave form

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Figure 26

Engine operating conditions investigated

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Figure 27

LUi evaluated for four different tests at 4000rpm and 6.70bar BMEP with different misfire patterns

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Figure 28

LUi evaluated for four different tests at 4000rpm and 6.70bar BMEP with different misfire patterns applying the torsional vibration compensation

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Figure 29

Detection capability obtained over the whole engine operating range with (w) and without (w∕o) torsional vibration compensation.

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