0
Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Cycle Innovations

Performance of a Novel Combined Cooling and Power Gas Turbine With Water Harvesting

[+] Author and Article Information
J. R. Khan

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, 232 MAE Building B, P.O. Box 116300, Gainesville, FL 32611-6300jameel.khan@yahoo.com

W. E. Lear

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, 232 MAE Building B, P.O. Box 116300, Gainesville, FL 32611-6300lear@ufl.edu

S. A. Sherif1

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, 232 MAE Building B, P.O. Box 116300, Gainesville, FL 32611-6300sasherif@ufl.edu

John F. Crittenden

 Triad Research Corporation, 2825 NW 23rd Drive, Gainesville, FL 32605jcrittenden@gmail.com

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 130(4), 041702 (Apr 28, 2008) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2830854 History: Received June 25, 2004; Revised October 05, 2007; Published April 28, 2008

A thermodynamic design-point performance analysis is performed on a novel cooling and power cycle that combines a semiclosed cycle gas turbine called the high-pressure regenerative turbine engine (HPRTE) with a vapor absorption refrigeration system (VARS). Waste heat from the recirculated combustion gas of the HPRTE is used to power the VARS. Water produced as a product of combustion is intentionally condensed and harvested. A part of the VARS cooling is used to chill the gas entering the high-pressure compressor, allowing water condensation and extraction as well as large efficiency gains. The remaining cooling capacity is provided to an external refrigeration load. The cycle is modeled using zero-dimensional steady-state thermodynamics, considering conservative values of polytropic efficiencies, a conservative model for turbine blade cooling, conservative values of pressure drops for the turbomachinery, including heat exchangers, and accurate correlations for the properties of the LiBrH2O mixture and the combustion products. The cycle is shown to operate with a thermal efficiency greater than 40% for parameters appropriate to medium sized engines, while producing about 1.5kg of water per kilogram of fuel (propane) consumed. This thermal efficiency is in addition to the large cooling effect generated in the evaporator of VARS, equivalent to 3–4% increased efficiency. The efficiency would be greater than 51% without turbine cooling bleed. The refrigeration ratio, defined as the ratio of external refrigeration load to the net work output, is found to be 0.38 for the base case. The water extracted is found to be a strong function of the recirculation ratio and low pressure compressor ratio PRc1. Based on these and prior results, which showed that the HPRTE is very compact and has inherently low emissions, it appears that this cycle would be well suited for distributed power and some vehicle applications, especially ones with associated air conditioning loads.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

(a) Schematic diagram of the HPRTE cycle. (b) T‐S diagram of the HPRTE cycle with ideal compression, ideal expansion, and no pressure drops.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Schematic diagram of vapor absorption refrigeration system

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

(a) Thermal efficiency ηth versus turbine inlet temperature for different values of the LPC ratio (PRC1). (b) Refrigeration ratio β versus turbine inlet temperature for different values of the LPC ratio (PRC1).

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

(a) Thermal efficiency ηth versus RECP inlet temperature for different values of the LPC ratio (PRC1). (b) Refrigeration ratio β versus RECP inlet temperature for different values of the LPC ratio (PRC1).

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

HPC ratio (PRC2) versus the RECP inlet temperature for different values of the LPC ratio (PRC1)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Variation of thermal efficiency versus LPC ratio (PRC1) for different values of the turbine inlet temperature (T6)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Water extraction parameter RW versus LPC ratio (PRC1) for different values of the turbine inlet temperature (T6)

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In