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Research Papers: Nuclear Power

Thermal-Design Options for Pressure-Channel SCWRS With Cogeneration of Hydrogen

[+] Author and Article Information
Maria Naidin

Faculty of Energy Systems and Nuclear Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, ON, L1K 7K4, Canadamaria.naidin@mycampus.uoit.ca

Sarah Mokry

Faculty of Energy Systems and Nuclear Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, ON, L1K 7K4, Canadasarah.mokry@mycampus.uoit.ca

Farina Baig

Faculty of Energy Systems and Nuclear Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, ON, L1K 7K4, Canadafarina.baig@gmail.com

Yevgeniy Gospodinov

Faculty of Energy Systems and Nuclear Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, ON, L1K 7K4, Canadayevgeniy.uoit@gmail.com

Udo Zirn

 Hitachi Power Systems America, Ltd., 645 Martinsville Road, Basking Ridge, NJ 07920udo.zirn@hal.hitachi.com

Igor Pioro

Faculty of Energy Systems and Nuclear Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, ON, L1K 7K4, Canadaigor.pioro@uoit.ca

Greg Naterer

Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, ON, L1K 7K4, Canadagreg.naterer@uoit.ca

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 131(1), 012901 (Oct 01, 2008) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2983016 History: Received June 17, 2008; Revised June 23, 2008; Published October 01, 2008

Currently there are a number of Generation IV supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor (SCWR) concepts under development worldwide. The main objectives for developing and utilizing SCWRs are (1) to increase the gross thermal efficiency of current nuclear power plants (NPPs) from 33–35% to approximately 45–50% and (2) to decrease the capital and operational costs and, in doing so, decrease electrical-energy costs (approximately US$ 1000kW or even less). SCW NPPs will have much higher operating parameters compared to current NPPs (i.e., pressures of about 25MPa and outlet temperatures of up to 625°C). Additionally, SCWRs will have a simplified flow circuit in which steam generators, steam dryers, steam separators, etc. will be eliminated. Furthermore, SCWRs operating at higher temperatures can facilitate an economical cogeneration of hydrogen through thermochemical cycles (particularly, the copper-chlorine cycle) or direct high-temperature electrolysis. To decrease significantly the development costs of a SCW NPP and to increase its reliability, it should be determined whether SCW NPPs can be designed with a steam-cycle arrangement that closely matches that of mature supercritical (SC) fossil power plants (including their SC turbine technology). On this basis, several conceptual steam-cycle arrangements of pressure-channel SCWRs, their corresponding Ts diagrams and steam-cycle thermal efficiencies are presented in this paper together with major parameters of the copper-chlorine cycle for the cogeneration of hydrogen. Also, bulk-fluid temperature and thermophysical properties profiles were calculated for a nonuniform cosine axial heat-flux distribution along a generic SCWR fuel channel, for reference purposes.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Pressure-temperature diagram of water for typical operating conditions of SCWRs and modern reactors (2)

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Figure 2

No-reheat cycle layout (a) and the corresponding T‐s diagram (b)

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Figure 3

Single-reheat cycle layout (a) and the corresponding T‐s diagram (b)

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Figure 4

Double-reheat cycle layout (a) and the corresponding T‐s diagram (b)

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Figure 5

Single-reheat cycle with heat regeneration through a single deaerator

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Figure 6

Single-reheat cycle with heat regeneration through a single deaerator and two feedwater heaters

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Figure 7

Single-reheat cycle with heat regeneration and cogeneration of hydrogen (shown only the part related to hydrogen cogeneration)

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Figure 8

Axial heat flux distribution along the SCWR heated channel

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Figure 9

Bulk-fluid temperature and thermophysical properties profiles for water along the heated length of the fuel channel

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Figure 10

Prandtl number and specific heat profiles for water along the heated length of the fuel channel

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