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Research Papers: Internal Combustion Engines

Cylinder-to-Cylinder Variations in a V6 Gasoline Direct Injection HCCI Engine

[+] Author and Article Information
Jacek Misztal, Hongming Xu, Miroslaw L. Wyszynski, Athanasios Tsolakis

Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK

Jun Qiao

 Jaguar Cars Limited, W/2/021 Engineering Centre, Abbey Road, Whitley, Coventry CV3 4LF, UK

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 131(4), 042801 (Apr 09, 2009) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3077661 History: Received February 27, 2008; Revised October 17, 2008; Published April 09, 2009

Despite the fact that homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) has been demonstrated as a combustion technology feasible for implementation with different fuels in various types of engines, cylinder-to-cylinder variations (CTCVs) in multicylinder HCCI engines remain one of the technical obstacles to overcome. A reduction in CTCV requires further developments in control technology. This study has been carried out with regard to the overall engine parameters, involving geometric differences between individual cylinders, coolant paths through the engine, combustion chamber deposits, and also the differences in the inlet temperature distributions between the cylinders. Experimental investigations on the Jaguar V6 HCCI research engine with negative valve overlapping and cam profile switching show that the differences in the rate of pressure rise between the cylinders can be larger than 1 bar/CA deg and that the load differences can be as high as 5–10%. It has been found that some individual cylinders will approach the misfiring limit far earlier than the others. The complex interaction between a number of parameters makes the control of the multicylinder engine a serious challenge. In order to avoid these differences, an active cylinder balancing strategy will be required. It has been observed that spark assistance and split injection strategy deliver the best control for the cylinder balance. However, spark assistance is restricted to low loads and low engine speeds, while split injection requires a considerable effort to optimize its possible settings. This paper defines the most important parameters influencing cylinder-to-cylinder variations in the HCCI engine and aims to put forward suggestions that can help to minimize the effect of cylinder-to-cylinder variations on the overall engine performance.

Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Engine coolant path sketch

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Figure 2

Research engine with thermal management system

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Figure 3

Engine banks load spread caused by blocked three way catalyst

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Figure 4

CAMFB50% variation in the V6 test engine

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Figure 5

Inlet port air temperature distribution in the V6 test engine

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Figure 6

Peak in-cylinder pressure distribution in motoring mode

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Figure 7

AFR cylinder-to-cylinder variations for the V6 test engine

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Figure 8

Unburned hydrocarbons CTCV for the V6 test engine

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Figure 9

Rate of heat release for fuel quantity adjustments

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Figure 10

Rate of heat release for engine bank A when split injection was applied

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Figure 11

MFB for bank A of the engine when split injection was applied

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Figure 12

Cylinder B1 pressure with spark addition at 1500 rpm

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Figure 13

Rate of pressure rise with spark addition at 1500 rpm

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Figure 14

Rate of heat release for cylinder B1 with spark addition at 1500 rpm

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Figure 15

Rate of heat release for cylinder B3 with spark addition at 1500 rpm

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Figure 16

MFB50% for cylinder B1 with spark addition at 1500 rpm

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Figure 17

Effect of spark adjustments on combustion phasing in-cylinder B1

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Figure 18

Rate of heat release for cylinder B1 for spark addition on 2500 rpm

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