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Research Papers: Internal Combustion Engines

Experimental Study of Oxygen-Enriched Diesel Combustion Using Simulated Exhaust Gas Recirculation

[+] Author and Article Information
Peter L. Perez

 Pennsylvania State University, 411 Academic Activities Building, University Park, PA 16802-2308

Andre L. Boehman1

 Pennsylvania State University, 411 Academic Activities Building, University Park, PA 16802-2308boehman@ems.psu.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 131(4), 042802 (Apr 09, 2009) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3077647 History: Received January 15, 2008; Revised December 23, 2008; Published April 09, 2009

The techniques of design of experiments were applied to study the best operational conditions for oxygen-enriched combustion in a single-cylinder direct-injection diesel engine in order to reduce particulate matter (PM) emissions, with minimal deterioration in nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions, by controlling fuel injection timing, carbon dioxide (CO2) and O2 volume fractions in intake air. The results showed that CO2 addition reduced average combustion temperatures and minimized the rate of increase in NOx emissions observed during oxygen-enriched conditions. It was also observed that oxygen enrichment minimized the deterioration in brake-specific fuel consumption and hydrocarbon and PM emissions that occurred at the highest level of CO2 addition.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Peak bulk-gas temperature versus FIT, load, speed, and CO2

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Figure 2

Cylinder pressure and bulk-gas temperatures at the latest (3.0 deg bTDC) and earliest (8.4 deg bTDC) fuel injection timing (2100 rpm, 50% load)

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Figure 3

Rate and cumulative heat release at the latest (3.0 deg bTDC) and earliest (8.4 deg bTDC) fuel injection timing (2100 rpm, 50% load)

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Figure 4

BSFC versus FIT, CO2, and O2 (2100 rpm, 50% load)

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Figure 5

Interaction plot for BSFC versus CO2 and O2 volume fractions (2100 rpm, 50% load)

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Figure 6

HC emissions versus O2 and CO2 volume fractions (2100 rpm, 50% load)

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Figure 7

Interaction plots for HC emissions (2100 rpm, 50% load)

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Figure 8

CO emissions versus FIT, O2, and CO2 volume fractions (2100 rpm, 50% load)

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Figure 9

NOx emissions versus FIT, O2, and CO2 volume fractions (2100 rpm, 50% load)

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Figure 10

Interaction plot for NOx emissions versus CO2 and O2 (2100 rpm, 50% load)

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Figure 11

PM emissions versus O2 and CO2 volume fractions (2100 rpm, 50% load)

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Figure 12

Interaction plots for PM emissions (2100 rpm, 50% load)

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