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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Combustion, Fuels, and Emissions

Passive Control of the Inlet Acoustic Boundary of a Swirled Burner at High Amplitude Combustion Instabilities

[+] Author and Article Information
Nicolas Tran, Sebastien Ducruix

Laboratoire EM2C, CNRS-Ecole Centrale Paris, Châtenay-Malabry 92295, France

Thierry Schuller1

Laboratoire EM2C, CNRS-Ecole Centrale Paris, Châtenay-Malabry 92295, Francethierry.schuller@em2c.ecp.fr

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 131(5), 051502 (Jun 05, 2009) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3078206 History: Received July 24, 2008; Revised September 06, 2008; Published June 05, 2009

Perforated panels placed upstream of the premixing tube of a turbulent swirled burner are investigated as a passive control solution for combustion instabilities. Perforated panels backed by a cavity are widely used as acoustic liners, mostly in the hot gas region of combustion chambers to reduce pure tone noises. This paper focuses on the use of this technology in the fresh reactants zone to control the inlet acoustic reflection coefficient of the burner and to stabilize the combustion. This method is shown to be particularly efficient because high acoustic fluxes issued from the combustion region are concentrated on a small surface area inside the premixer. Theoretical results are used to design two types of perforated plates featuring similar acoustic damping properties when submitted to low amplitude pressure fluctuations (linear regime). Their behaviors nonetheless largely differ when facing large pressure fluctuation levels (nonlinear regime) typical of those encountered during self-sustained combustion oscillations. Conjectures are given to explain these differences. These two plates are then used to clamp thermoacoustic oscillations. Significant damping is only observed for the plate featuring a robust response to increasing sound levels. While developed on a laboratory scale swirled combustor, this method is more general and may be adapted to more practical configurations.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Implementation of the passive control device at the inlet boundary condition of the burner. Microphone locations are indicated in the setup and a typical flame snapshot obtained from OH-LIF is shown to locate the flame.

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Figure 2

Schematic of the impedance tube. The passive control system is located at the top of the impedance tube, above microphone M2.

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Figure 3

Plate P8, modulus of the reflection coefficient as a function of the depth and the frequency. SPL=110 dB.

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Figure 4

Plate P4, modulus of the reflection coefficient as a function of the depth and the frequency. SPL=110 dB.

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Figure 5

Comparison between theoretical predictions (lines) and experimental data (symbols) for both plates at f=300 Hz. Black symbols and continuous line: P8. Gray symbols and dashed line: P4. SPL=110 dB.

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Figure 6

Effect of the SPL on plates P8 and P4. Two frequencies were chosen for each plate, one yielding an almost perfect reflection (squares) and the other a nearly anechoic termination (circles).

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Figure 7

PSD inside the premixer using the passive control solution with plate P8. Microphone M2. Indicated moduli values correspond to predictions for a SPL of 110 dB.

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Figure 8

PSD inside the chamber using the passive control solution with plate P8. Microphone Mch. Indicated moduli values correspond to predictions for a SPL of 110 dB.

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Figure 9

PSD inside the premixer using the passive control solution with plate P4. Microphone M2. Indicated moduli values correspond to both prediction and measurements for a SPL of 140 dB.

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Figure 10

PSD inside the chamber using the passive control solution with plate P4. Microphone Mch. Indicated moduli values correspond to both prediction and measurements for a SPL of 140 dB.

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