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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Structures and Dynamics

Implications of Turbine Erosion for an Aero-Engine’s High-Pressure-Turbine Blade’s Low-Cycle-Fatigue Life-Consumption

[+] Author and Article Information
Muhammad Naeem

 Institute of Space Technology (IST), P.O. Box 2750, Islamabad 44000, Pakistan

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 131(5), 052501 (May 22, 2009) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3078383 History: Received May 06, 2008; Revised December 01, 2008; Published May 22, 2009

Some in-service deterioration in any mechanical device, such as a military aero-engine, is inevitable. As a result of experiencing any deterioration, an aero-engine will seek a different steady operating point thereby resulting in a variation in the high-pressure spool speeds in order to provide the same thrust to keep aircraft’s performance invariant. Any increase in the high-pressure spool speed results in greater low-cycle fatigue damage for the hot-end components and thereby higher engine’s life-cycle costs. Possessing better knowledge (of the impacts of high-pressure turbine’s erosion upon the low-cycle fatigue life-consumption of aero-engine’s hot-end components) helps the users to take wiser management decisions. For a military aircraft’s mission profile, using bespoke computer simulations, the impacts of turbine erosion for high-pressure turbine-blade’s low-cycle fatigue life-consumption have been predicted.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

HPSS at M 0.95, TET 1555 K, and ISAD 0 K for stipulated HPT EMs with increasing altitude

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Figure 2

HPSS at an altitude 10,000 m, TET 1555 K, and ISAD 0 K for stipulated HPT EMs with increasing M

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Figure 3

HPSS at an altitude 10,000 m, M 0.95, and TET 1555 K for stipulated HPT EMs with increasing ISAD

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Figure 4

HPSS at an altitude 10,000 m, M 0.95, and ISAD 0 K for stipulated HPT EMs with increasing TET

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Figure 5

HPSS at an altitude 10,000 m, M 0.95, TET 1555 K, and ISAD 0 K for stipulated HPT EMs with increasing HPT’s erosion

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Figure 6

HPSS at an altitude 10,000 m, M 0.95, ISAD 0 K, and constant NT for stipulated HPT EMs with increasing HPT’s erosion

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Figure 7

HPSS at an altitude 10,000 m, M 0.95, ISAD 0 K, and a constant LPSS for stipulated HPT EMs with increasing HPT’s erosion

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Figure 8

HPSS during stipulated flight phase

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Figure 9

HPSS at stipulated conditions with increasing HPT’s erosion

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Figure 10

MHPSS during TO for stipulated EMs with increasing HPT’s erosion

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Figure 11

MHPSS during ACC for stipulated EMs with increasing HPT’s erosion

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Figure 12

MHPSS during RH for stipulated EMs with increasing HPT’s erosion

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Figure 13

MHPSS during enhancement of power to 80%, attaining maximum M and cruising at constant power setting for stipulated EMs with increasing HPT’s erosion

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Figure 14

HPT blade’s LCF life-consumption (for stipulated mission profiles) with increasing HPT’s erosion

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