0
Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Combustion, Fuels, and Emissions

Effect of Flame Structure on the Flame Transfer Function in a Premixed Gas Turbine Combustor

[+] Author and Article Information
Daesik Kim, Bryan D. Quay, Domenic A. Santavicca

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802

Jong Guen Lee1

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802

Kwanwoo Kim, Shiva Srinivasan

 GE Energy, Greenville, SC 29615

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 132(2), 021502 (Oct 16, 2009) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3124664 History: Received April 01, 2008; Revised May 09, 2008; Published October 16, 2009

The flame transfer function in a premixed gas turbine combustor is experimentally determined. The fuel (natural gas) is premixed with air upstream of a choked inlet to the combustor. Therefore, the input to the flame transfer function is the imposed velocity fluctuations of the fuel/air mixture without equivalence ratio fluctuations. The inlet-velocity fluctuations are achieved by a variable-speed siren over the forcing frequency of 75–280 Hz and measured using a hot-wire anemometer at the inlet to the combustor. The output function (heat release) is determined using chemiluminescence measurement from the whole flame. Flame images are recorded to understand how the flame structure plays a role in the global heat release response of flame to the inlet-velocity perturbation. The results show that the gain and phase of the flame transfer function depend on flame structure as well as the frequency and magnitude of inlet-velocity modulation and can be generalized in terms of the relative length scale of flame to convection length scale of inlet-velocity perturbation, which is represented by a Strouhal number. Nonlinear flame response is characterized by a periodic vortex shedding from shear layer, and the nonlinearity occurs at lower magnitude of inlet-velocity fluctuation as the modulation frequency increases. However, for a given modulation frequency, the flame structure does not affect the magnitude of inlet-velocity fluctuation at which the nonlinear flame response starts to appear.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Schematic diagram of experimental setup

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Schematic drawing of the combustor and nozzle assembly

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Maximum and minimum amplitudes of velocity fluctuations at each modulation frequency (Vmean,nozzle=30 m/s)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

(a) Time traces and (b) frequency spectra of CH∗ and OH∗ and inlet-velocity fluctuations (Vmean,nozzle=30 m/s, ϕ=0.7, f=75 Hz, and V′/Vmean=0.07)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Effects of modulation frequency and equivalence ratio on the flame structure (Vmean,nozzle=30 m/s and V′/Vmean=0.07)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Flame’s COM location as a function of modulation frequency and equivalence ratio (Vmean,nozzle=30 m/s and V′/Vmean=0.07)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Normalized CH∗ intensity fluctuation as a function of modulation frequency and equivalence ratio (Vmean,nozzle=30 m/s and V′/Vmean=0.07)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Effects of modulation frequency on flame structure for one period of modulation (Vmean,nozzle=30 m/s, ϕ=0.65, and V′/Vmean=0.07)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Effects of modulation frequency on flame structure for one period of modulation (Vmean,nozzle=30 m/s, ϕ=0.75, and V′/Vmean=0.07)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

(a) Phase of transfer function and (b) convection time delay as a function of modulation frequency and equivalence ratio (Vmean,nozzle=30 m/s and V′/Vmean=0.07)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Effective convection velocity as a function of modulation frequency and equivalence ratio (Vmean,nozzle=30 m/s and V′/Vmean=0.07)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

(a) Gain and (b) phase of the transfer function versus Strouhal number (Vmean,nozzle=30 m/s and V′/Vmean=0.07)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

(a) Normalized amplitude of CH∗ fluctuation, gain, and phase of the transfer function as a function of modulation amplitude for Vmean,nozzle=30 m/s and ϕ=0.75 and (b) magnitude of V′/Vmean at which the flame response changes from linear to nonlinear as a function of modulation frequency

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In