0
Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Cycle Innovations

Gas Turbine Performance and Health Status Estimation Using Adaptive Gas Path Analysis

[+] Author and Article Information
Y. G. Li

School of Engineering, Cranfield University, Bedford MK43 0AL, UK

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 132(4), 041701 (Jan 25, 2010) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3159378 History: Received March 23, 2009; Revised March 26, 2009; Published January 25, 2010; Online January 25, 2010

In gas turbine operations, engine performance and health status are very important information for engine operators. Such engine performance is normally represented by engine airflow rate, compressor pressure ratios, compressor isentropic efficiencies, turbine entry temperature, turbine isentropic efficiencies, etc., while the engine health status is represented by compressor and turbine efficiency indices and flow capacity indices. However, these crucial performance and health information cannot be directly measured and therefore are not easily available. In this research, a novel Adaptive Gas Path Analysis (Adaptive GPA) approach has been developed to estimate actual engine performance and gas path component health status by using gas path measurements, such as gas path pressures, temperatures, shaft rotational speeds, fuel flow rate, etc. Two steps are included in the Adaptive GPA approach, the first step is the estimation of degraded engine performance status by a novel application of a performance adaptation method, and the second step is the estimation of engine health status at component level by using a new diagnostic method introduced in this paper, based on the information obtained in the first step. The developed Adaptive GPA approach has been tested in four test cases where the performance and degradation of a model gas turbine engine similar to Rolls-Royce aero engine Avon-300 have been analyzed. The case studies have shown that the developed novel linear and nonlinear Adaptive GPA approaches can accurately and quickly estimate the degraded engine performance and predict the degradation of major engine gas path components with the existence of measurement noise. The test cases have also shown that the calculation time required by the approach is short enough for its potential online applications.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Nonlinear Newton–Raphson method (11)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Compressor characteristic map

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Combustor characteristic map

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Turbine characteristic map

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Procedure of performance and health status estimation using Adaptive GPA

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Model gas turbine configuration

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Comparisons between simulated measurement samples and true values

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Predicted degradation with linear and nonlinear Adaptive GPAs in test case 2

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Comparison of Adaptive GPA errors in test case 3

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 14

Predicted degradation with Adaptive GPA in test case 3

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 15

Convergence process of nonlinear Adaptive GPA in test case 3

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Predicted degradation with linear and nonlinear Adaptive GPAs in test case 1

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Comparison of linear and nonlinear Adaptive GPA errors in test case 2

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Comparison of linear and nonlinear Adaptive GPA errors in test case 1

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Measurement deviations (i.e., fault signatures) in three test cases (Tamb=288.15 K, Pamb=1 atm, and TET is constant)

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In