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Research Papers: Internal Combustion Engines

Transient Control of Combustion Phasing and Lambda in a Six-Cylinder Port-Injected Natural-Gas Engine

[+] Author and Article Information
Mehrzad Kaiadi, Magnus Lewander, Patrick Borgqvist, Per Tunestal, Bengt Johansson

Division of Combustion Engines, Faculty of Engineering, Lund University, Lund 22437, Sweden

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 132(9), 092805 (Jun 18, 2010) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000605 History: Received May 25, 2009; Revised May 27, 2009; Published June 18, 2010; Online June 18, 2010

Fuel economy and emissions are the two central parameters in heavy duty engines. High exhaust gas recirculation rates combined with turbocharging has been identified as a promising way to increase the maximum load and efficiency of heavy duty spark ignition engines. With stoichiometric conditions, a three way catalyst can be used, which keeps the regulated emissions at very low levels. The Lambda window, which results in very low emissions, is very narrow. This issue is more complex with transient operation, resulting in losing brake efficiency and also catalyst converting efficiency. This paper presents different control strategies to maximize the reliability for maintaining efficiency and emissions levels under transient conditions. Different controllers are developed and tested successfully on a heavy duty six-cylinder port injected natural gas engine. Model predictive control was used to control lambda, which was modeled using system identification. Furthermore, a proportional integral regulator combined with a feedforward map for obtaining maximum brake torque timing was applied. The results show that excellent steady-state and transient performance can be achieved.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

The Engine and its control system

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Figure 2

System identification of lambda by PRBS signals

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Figure 3

Validation of the lambda model

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Figure 4

MPC controller structure

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Figure 5

Effect of ignition timing on brake efficiency and SFC

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Figure 6

MBT timing for different loads and speeds

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Figure 7

CA50 of all six cylinders with and without MBT controller

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Figure 8

Individual ignition control (feedback control) with load step change at 1200 rpm

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Figure 9

Individual ignition control (feedforward+feedback control) with load step change at 1200 rpm

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Figure 10

Results of the MPC lambda controller with step change of the throttle inside the model range

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Figure 11

Results of the MPC lambda controller with ramp change of the throttle in the model range

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Figure 12

Results of the MPC lambda controller with step change of the throttle outside of the model range (30–50%)

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Figure 13

Results of the MPC lambda controller with step change of the throttle out of the model range at 800 rpm

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Figure 14

Results of the MPC lambda controller with step change of the speed in the model range

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Figure 15

Results of the lambda MPC regulator with step change of the EGR in the model range (10% EGR rate)

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Figure 16

Results of the lambda PI regulator with step change of the throttle

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Figure 17

Results of the lambda PI regulator with step change of the throttle

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