0
Research Papers: Internal Combustion Engines

Combustion and Emissions Characterization of Soy Methyl Ester Biodiesel Blends in an Automotive Turbocharged Diesel Engine

[+] Author and Article Information
Benjamin W. Moscherosch, Christopher J. Polonowski, Scott A. Miers, Jeffrey D. Naber

 Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI 49931-1295

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 132(9), 092806 (Jun 18, 2010) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000607 History: Received May 26, 2009; Revised June 08, 2009; Published June 18, 2010; Online June 18, 2010

Recent increases in petroleum fuel costs, corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) regulations, and environmental concerns about CO2 emissions from petroleum based fuels have created an increased opportunity for diesel engines and non-petroleum renewable fuels such as biodiesel. Additionally, the Environmental Protection Agencies Tier II heavy duty and light duty emissions regulations require significant reductions in NOx and diesel particulate matter emissions for diesel engines. As a result, the diesel engine and aftertreatment system is a highly calibrated system that is sensitive to fuel characteristics. This study focuses on the impact of soy methyl ester biodiesel blends on combustion performance, NOx, and carbonaceous soot matter emissions. Tests were completed using a 1.9 L, turbocharged direct injection diesel engine using commercially available 15 ppm ultra low sulfur (ULS) diesel, a soy methyl ester B20 biodiesel blend (20vol% B100 and 80vol% ULS diesel), and a pure soy methyl ester biodiesel. Results show a reduction in NOx and carbonaceous soot matter emissions, and an increase in brake specific fuel consumption with the use of biodiesel. Further, traditional methodology assumes that diesel fuels with a high cetane number have a reduced ignition delay. However, results from this study show the cetane number is not the only parameter effecting ignition delay due to increased diffusion burn.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Engine system layout

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Effect of start of injection on brake specific fuel consumption

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Effect of start of injection on brake specific energy consumption

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Effect of start of injection on apparent heat release rates

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Effect of start of injection on ignition delay

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Effect of start of injection on EINOx emissions

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Effect of start of combustion on EINOx emissions

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Effect of start of combustion on BSNOx emissions

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Effect of start of combustion on normalized EINOx emissions

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

NO2 contribution to total NOx emissions

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In