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Technical Briefs

Hydrogen Peroxide-Based Gas Generator Design and Performance Testing as an Aircraft Emergency Power Unit

[+] Author and Article Information
Gyaebyung Yang

Department of Aerospace Engineering, School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Systems Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701, Republic of Koreagbyang@kaist.ac.kr

Daejong Park

Department of Aerospace Engineering, School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Systems Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701, Republic of Koreanasaboy@kaist.ac.kr

Chun Taek Kim

Department of Engine Development, Aeronautics Research and Development Head Office, Korea Aerospace Research Institute, 155, Gwahangno, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-333, Republic of Koreactkim@kari.re.kr

Sejin Kwon

Department of Aerospace Engineering, School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Systems Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701, Republic of Koreatrumpet@kaist.ac.kr

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 132(11), 114504 (Aug 12, 2010) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000896 History: Received August 10, 2009; Revised September 05, 2009; Published August 12, 2010; Online August 12, 2010

Hydrazine monopropellant is often used with a spontaneous catalyst a high-performance aircraft emergency power unit (EPU) and in aerospace propulsion; however, it is toxic and requires special handling. A hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-based gas generator, which is suitable for a new family of environmentally friendly monopropellants and is a substitute for toxic hydrazine in EPUs, is introduced in this study. A MnO2/Al2O3 catalyst for H2O2 decomposition, superior to silver catalysts at normal starting and reactivity capabilities, was selected and developed. The performance tests of coupling the gas generator with a turbocharger showed acceptable results for an aircraft EPU with decomposition above 90%, 37 kW maximum turbine output power, and a maximum starting delay of 1.2 s during normal starting operation. The gas generator also demonstrated satisfactory performance during repeated pulse operation at a pulse duration of 3 s and 60 s under various output conditions.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Comparison of oxygen generation using 16–20 mesh catalysts (Ag/Al2O3 versus MnO2/Al2O3)

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Figure 2

Requirements of the gas generator and design results

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Figure 3

Experimental schematic of the gas generator for the EPU

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Figure 4

Temperature, pressure, and turbine speed profile of the EPU system at the maximum power operating condition: (a) pressure and turbine speed profile and (b) temperature and turbine speed profile

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Figure 5

Temperature, pressure, and turbine speed profile of the EPU system: (a) 3 s on-off pulse test at the maximum power operating condition and (b) 60 s duration test at the normal power operating condition

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