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Gas Turbines: Cycle Innovations

An Integrated Approach for the Multidisciplinary Design of Optimum Rotorcraft Operations

[+] Author and Article Information
Ioannis Goulos

Department of Power & Propulsion  Cranfield University, Bedfordshire MK43 0AL, UKi.goulos@cranfield.ac.uk

Vassilios Pachidis

Department of Power & Propulsion  Cranfield University, Bedfordshire MK43 0AL, UKv.pachidis@cranfield.ac.uk

Roberto d’Ippolito

 NOESIS Solutions, Gaston Geenslaan, 11, B4, 3001 Leuven, BEroberto.dippolito@noesissolutions.com

Jos Stevens

 National Aerospace Laboratory NLR, Anthony Fokkerweg 2, 1059 CM Amsterdam, NLJos.Stevens@nlr.nl

Chrissy Smith

 AgustaWestland, Westland Works, Lysander Road, Yeovil BA20 2YB, UKChrissy.Smith@agustawestland.com

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 134(9), 091701 (Jul 18, 2012) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4006982 History: Received June 16, 2012; Revised June 18, 2012; Published July 17, 2012; Online July 18, 2012

This work focuses on the development and application of a generic methodology targeting the design of optimum rotorcraft operations in terms of fuel burn, gaseous emissions, and ground noise impact. An integrated tool capable of estimating the performance and emitted noise of any defined rotorcraft configuration within any designated mission has been deployed. A comprehensive and cost-effective optimization strategy has been structured. The methodology has been applied to two generic, baseline missions representative of current rotorcraft operations. Optimally designed operations for fuel burn, gaseous emissions, and ground noise impact have been obtained. A comparative evaluation has been waged between the acquired optimum designs. The respective trade-off arising from the incorporation of flight paths optimized for different objectives has been quantified. Pareto front derived models for fuel burn and emitted noise have been structured for each mission. The Pareto models have been subsequently deployed for the design of operations optimized in a multidisciplinary manner. The results have shown that the proposed methodology is promising with regards to achieving simultaneous reduction in fuel burn, gaseous emissions, and ground noise impact for any defined mission. The obtainable reductions are found to be dependent on the designated mission. Finally, the potential to design optimum operations in a multidisciplinary fashion using only a single design criterion is demonstrated.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Integrated tool architecture

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Figure 2

Baseline missions EPNL noise contours: (a) police mission, (b) passenger mission

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Figure 3

Route specification range of variables: (a) police mission, (b) passenger mission

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Figure 4

Optimum/baseline flight paths comparison—police mission: (a) altitude, (b) airspeed

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Figure 5

Optimum/baseline flight paths comparison—passenger mission: (a) altitude, (b) airspeed

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Figure 6

EPNL optimized missions noise contours: (a) police mission, (b) passenger mission

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Figure 7

Pareto fronts for fuel burn and EPNL: (a) police mission, (b) passenger mission

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Figure 8

Fuel burn—EPNL optimized mission noise contours: (a) police mission, (b) passenger mission

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