0
Research Papers: Nuclear Power

Effect of Void Fraction on Pressure Drop in Upward Vertical Two-Phase Gas-Liquid Pipe Flow

[+] Author and Article Information
Clement C. Tang

e-mail: clement.tang@engr.und.edu

Sanjib Tiwari

e-mail: sanjib.tiwari@my.und.edu
Mechanical Engineering Department,
University of North Dakota,
Grand Forks, ND 58202

Afshin J. Ghajar

School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,
Oklahoma State University,
Stillwater, OK 74078
e-mail: afshin.ghajar@okstate.edu

Contributed by the Nuclear Division of ASME for publication in the Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power. Manuscript received September 13, 2012; final manuscript received September 19, 2012; published online January 8, 2013. Editor: Dilip R. Ballal.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 135(2), 022901 (Jan 08, 2013) (7 pages) Paper No: GTP-12-1356; doi: 10.1115/1.4007762 History: Received September 13, 2012; Revised September 19, 2012

Experimental data for the void fraction and two-phase frictional pressure drop from various sources has been compiled and analyzed. The experimental data revealed that at the lower range of superficial gas velocity and void fraction, the variations of the two-phase frictional pressure drop with superficial gas velocity and void fraction are relatively flat. However, as the superficial gas velocity and void fraction increase to higher values, the frictional pressure drop became significantly sensitive to the two parameters. In a situation when the two-phase pressure drop is sensitive to the variation of the void fraction, it is then that the proper and accurate characterization of the void fraction becomes significant. From the experimental data, regions where the pressure drop is sensitive to the variation of the void fraction are identified and evaluated.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2013 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Schematic of the experimental setup for measuring the pressure drop and void fraction

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Schematic of the test section mounted on a platform that can be adjusted for a 0 deg to ±90 deg pipe orientation

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Comparison of the measured and calculated single-phase flow friction factor

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Variation of the void fraction with superficial gas velocity for upward vertical two-phase flow [6]

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Variation of the air-water flow frictional pressure gradient with superficial gas velocity

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Comparison of (Δp/L)f with data from Ref. [16] for the air-water flow with usl at approximately 0.08 m/s

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Comparison of (Δp/L)f with data from Refs. [16,18] for the air-water flow with usl at approximately 0.3 and 1 m/s

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Comparison of (Δp/L)f with data from Refs. [16,19] for different two-phase mixtures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Variation of the air-water flow frictional pressure gradient with the void fraction for 0.31 < usl < 1.17 m/s

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Comparison of the frictional pressure gradient versus the void fraction with data from Ref. [16] for the air-water and air-glycerin (59%) mixtures

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In