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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Combustion, Fuels, and Emissions

Experimental and Computational Determination of Laminar Burning Velocity of Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Air Mixtures at Elevated Temperatures

[+] Author and Article Information
Mohammad Akram

Research Scholar
e-mail: akram.iitb@gmail.com

Sudarshan Kumar

Associate Professor
e-mail: sudar4@gmail.com
Department of Aerospace Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology Bombay,
Mumbai 400076, India

Priyank Saxena

Principal Engineer
Combustion Engineering,
Solar Turbine Inc.,
San Diego, CA 92128
e-mail: Saxena_Priyank@solarturbines.com

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Combustion and Fuels Committee of ASME for publication in the Journal of Turbomachinery. Manuscript received December 3, 2012; final manuscript received May 8, 2013; published online July 31, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Joseph Zelina.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 135(9), 091501 (Jul 31, 2013) (5 pages) Paper No: GTP-12-1463; doi: 10.1115/1.4024798 History: Received December 03, 2012; Revised May 08, 2013

The laminar burning velocity of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) air mixtures at high temperatures is extracted from the planar flames stabilized in the preheated mesoscale diverging channel. The experiments were carried out for a range of equivalence ratios and mixture temperatures. Computational predictions of the burning velocity and detailed flame structure were performed using the PREMIX code with USC mech 2.0. The present data are in very good agreement with both the recent experimental and computational results available. A peak burning velocity was observed for slightly rich mixtures, even at higher mixture temperatures. The minimum value of th temperature exponent is observed for slightly rich mixtures.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Energy produced per unit volume versus per unit mass for various fuels

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Fig. 2

The stable planar flames for the LPG-air mixture at different conditions

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Fig. 3

Effect of the mixture temperature on the burning velocity of the stoichiometric LPG-air mixture

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Fig. 4

Effect of the mixture temperature on the burning velocity of lean and rich LPG-air mixtures

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Fig. 5

The heat release rate of the stoichiometric LPG-air mixture at two different temperatures

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Fig. 6

The temperature and species mole fraction variations of the stoichiometric LPG-air mixture at two different temperatures with axial distance

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Fig. 7

The radical species mole fraction variation of the stoichiometric LPG-air mixture at two different temperatures with the nondimensional temperature

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Fig. 8

Variation of the temperature exponent of LPG-air mixtures with the equivalence ratio

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Fig. 9

Computed mole fractions of participating species for LPG-air mixtures at two different temperatures

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Fig. 10

Comparison of the laminar burning velocity of LPG-air mixtures at an ambient temperature of 300 K

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Fig. 11

Comparison of the predicted and experimental laminar burning velocities of LPG-air mixtures at different elevated temperatures

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Fig. 12

Comparison of the laminar burning velocity of LPG-air mixtures at an ambient temperature of 300 K with other hydrocarbon fuel-air mixtures

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