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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Combustion, Fuels, and Emissions

Defeat of the Soot/NOx Trade-off Using Biodiesel-Ethanol in a Moderate Exhaust Gas Recirculation Premixed Low-Temperature Combustion Mode

[+] Author and Article Information
Haoyue Zhu

Key Laboratory of Power
Machinery and Engineering,
Ministry of Education,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, China;
Walter E. Lay Automotive Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109
e-mail: zhuhaoyue@sjtu.edu.cn

Stanislav V. Bohac

Walter E. Lay Automotive Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109
e-mail: sbohac@umich.edu

Zhen Huang

Key Laboratory of Power
Machinery and Engineering,
Ministry of Education,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, China
e-mail: z-huang@sjtu.edu.cn

Dennis N. Assanis

Walter E. Lay Automotive Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109;
Office of the Provost,
Stony Brook University,
Stony Brook, NY 11794
e-mail: dennis.assanis@stonybrook.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Combustion and Fuels Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received December 9, 2012; final manuscript received April 28, 2013; published online July 31, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Paolo Chiesa.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 135(9), 091502 (Jul 31, 2013) (7 pages) Paper No: GTP-12-1477; doi: 10.1115/1.4024380 History: Received December 09, 2012; Revised April 28, 2013

The soot/nitric oxides (NOx) trade-off of diesel, biodiesel, and biodiesel–ethanol in a moderate exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) premixed low temperature combustion (LTC) mode is investigated in this study. Compared to diesel, biodiesel demonstrates poorer spray behavior and shorter ignition delay, but its oxygen content results in less soot. Blending ethanol into biodiesel enhances spray behavior, prolongs ignition delay, and further increases fuel oxygen fraction, resulting in a larger reduction in soot. In the moderate EGR premixed low temperature combustion mode, an obvious soot/NOx trade-off is demonstrated with diesel fuel. The soot/NOx trade-off is improved by biodiesel fuel and defeated by the biodiesel–ethanol blend. Low soot, low NOx, and high combustion efficiency are achieved with the biodiesel–ethanol blend and proper EGR rate.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of test engine system

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Fig. 2

Spray images of diesel, biodiesel and BE30, 1.4 ms after start of injection

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Fig. 3

Spray behavior of diesel and biodiesel

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Fig. 4

Spray behavior of biodiesel–ethanol blends

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Fig. 5

Fuel injection timing, cylinder pressure, and heat release rate of test fuels

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Fig. 6

Global equivalence ratio of test fuels

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Fig. 7

Ignition delay of test fuels

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Fig. 8

Soot and NOx of diesel

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Fig. 9

Soot and NOx of biodiesel

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Fig. 10

Soot and NOx of BE20

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Fig. 11

Combustion efficiency and indicated thermal efficiency of test fuels

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Fig. 12

Soot/NOx trade-off of test fuels

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Fig. 13

Cyclic variation of test fuels

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