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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Combustion, Fuels, and Emissions

Large-Eddy Simulation of Turbulent Spray Combustion in a Subscale Aircraft Jet Engine Combustor—Predictions of NO and Soot Concentrations

[+] Author and Article Information
Hideki Moriai

Department of Mechanical
Engineering and Science,
Kyoto University,
Kyoto 615-8540, Japan;
Aerospace Systems,
Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd.,
Aichi 485-8561, Japan

Ryoichi Kurose

Department of Mechanical
Engineering and Science,
Kyoto University,
Kyoto 615-8540, Japan
e-mail: kurose@mech.kyoto-u.ac.jp

Hiroaki Watanabe

Energy Engineering Research Laboratory,
Central Research Institute of Electric
Power Industry (CRIEPI),
Kanagawa 240-0196, Japan

Yutaka Yano, Satoru Komori

Department of Mechanical
Engineering and Science,
Kyoto University,
Kyoto 615-8540, Japan

Fumiteru Akamatsu

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Osaka University,
Osaka 565-0871, Japan

Contributed by the Combustion and Fuels Committee of ASME for publication in the Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power. Manuscript received February 6, 2013; final manuscript received May 2, 2013; published online July 31, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Song-Charng Kong.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 135(9), 091503 (Jul 31, 2013) (10 pages) Paper No: GTP-13-1043; doi: 10.1115/1.4024868 History: Received February 06, 2013; Revised May 02, 2013

Large-eddy simulation (LES) is applied to turbulent spray combustion fields in a subscale (1/2) aircraft jet engine combustor with an air-blast type swirl fuel nozzle and validity is examined by comparing with measurements. In the LES, Jet-A is used as liquid fuel, and individual droplet motion is tracked in a Lagrangian manner with a parcel model. As a turbulent combustion model, the extended flamelet/progress-variable approach, in which heat transfer between droplets and ambient gas including radiation and heat loss from walls can be taken into account, is employed. A detailed chemistry mechanism of Jet-A with 1537 reactions and 274 chemical species is used. The radiative heat transfer is computed by the discrete ordinate (DO) method. The equivalence ratio ranges from 0.91 to 1.29. The comparisons of the predicted droplet velocity and size, gaseous temperature, NO, and soot emissions with the measurements show that the present LES is capable of capturing the general features of the turbulent spray combustion fields in the subscale (1/2) aircraft jet engine combustor.

Copyright © 2013 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Subscale (1/2) rectangular combustor with air-blast type swirl fuel nozzle; (a) combustor, (b) swirl fuel nozzle

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Fig. 2

Computational domain, grids, and nozzle configuration for LES; (a) computational domain, (b) grids in burner, (c) nozzle configuration

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Fig. 3

Initial droplet size distributions of injected fuel droplets; (a) φ = 0.91, (b) φ = 1.09, (c) φ = 1.29

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Fig. 4

Isosurface of instantaneous gaseous temperature (T = 1800 K) and instantaneous droplet distribution in case of ϕ = 1.09

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Fig. 5

Distributions of instantaneous gaseous temperature T and isosurface of droplet volume fraction on the x–y and y–z planes in case of ϕ = 1.09. The color range of black to white corresponds to 300–2000 (K) and white dots show the fuel droplets. (a) xy plane at z = 0; (b) yz plane at z = 5 mm.

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Fig. 6

Comparisons of radial profiles of predicted and measured time-averaged streamwise droplet velocities u¯d at three streamwise locations in case of ϕ = 1.09, together with predicted time-averaged streamwise flow velocities u¯; (a) x = 4.0 mm, (b) x = 8.0 mm, (c) x = 12.0 mm

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Fig. 7

Comparisons of radial profiles of predicted and measured Sauter mean diameters D32 at three streamwise locations in case of ϕ = 1.09

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Fig. 8

Radial profiles of predicted time-averaged azimuthal droplet velocities and flow velocities, u¯θ,d and u¯θ, at three streamwise locations in case of ϕ = 1.09; (a) x = 4.0 mm, (b) x = 8.0 mm, (c) x = 12.0 mm

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Fig. 9

Axial profiles of predicted time-averaged gaseous temperature T¯ and NO mass fraction Y¯NO in case of ϕ = 1.09, together with the measured values at the center of the combustor exit; (a) gaseous temperature, (b) NO mass fraction

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Fig. 10

Distributions of predicted instantaneous streamwise flow velocity u, gaseous temperature T, and mass fractions of evaporated fuel, oxygen O2, carbon dioxide CO2, and carbon monoxide CO, Yfuel, YO2, YCO2, and YCO, on the x–y plane in case of ϕ = 0.91. The color ranges of black to white correspond to −100–100 (m/s) for u, 300–2000 (K) for T, 0 – 1.0 × 10−4 (-) for fuel, 0–0.3 (-) for O2, 0–0.2 (-) for CO2, and 0–0.2 (-) for CO, respectively. (a) u, (b) T, (c) fuel, (d) O2, (e) CO2, (f) CO.

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Fig. 11

Distributions of predicted instantaneous streamwise flow velocity u, gaseous temperature T, and mass fractions of evaporated fuel, oxygen O2, carbon dioxide CO2, and carbon monoxide CO, Yfuel, YO2, YCO2, and YCO, on the x–y plane in case of ϕ = 1.09. The color ranges are as shown in Fig. 10. (a) u, (b) T, (c) fuel, (d) O2, (e) CO2, (f) CO.

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Fig. 12

Distributions of predicted instantaneous streamwise flow velocity u, gaseous temperature T, and mass fractions of evaporated fuel, oxygen O2, carbon dioxide CO2, and carbon monoxide CO, Yfuel, YO2, YCO2, and YCO, on the x–y plane in case of ϕ = 1.29. The color ranges are as shown in Fig. 10. (a) u, (b) T, (c) fuel, (d) O2, (e) CO2, (f) CO.

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Fig. 13

Distributions of predicted instantaneous mass fraction of hydroxyl radical OH, YOH, on the x–y plane in cases of ϕ = 0.91, 1.09, and 1.29. The color range of black to white corresponds to 0–5.0 × 10−3 (-). (a) φ = 0.91, (b) φ = 1.09, (c) φ = 1.29.

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Fig. 14

Distributions of predicted instantaneous mixture fraction Z and product mass fraction C on the x–y plane in case of ϕ = 0.91. The color ranges of black to white correspond to 0–0.2 (-) for Z and 0–0.4 (-) for C, respectively. (a) Z, (b) C.

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Fig. 15

Distributions of predicted instantaneous mixture fraction Z and product mass fraction C on the x–y plane in case of ϕ = 1.09. The color ranges are as shown in Fig. 14. (a) Z, (b) C.

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Fig. 16

Distributions of predicted instantaneous mixture fraction Z and product mass fraction C on the x–y plane in cases of ϕ = 1.29. The color ranges are as shown in Fig. 14. (a) Z, (b) C.

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Fig. 17

Distributions of predicted instantaneous mass fraction of nitrogen oxide NO, YNO, on the x–y plane in cases of ϕ = 0.91, 1.09, and 1.29. The color range of black to white corresponds to 0–6.0 × 10−5 (-). (a) φ = 0.91, (b) φ = 1.09, (c) φ = 1.29.

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Fig. 18

Distributions of predicted instantaneous soot radiation energy emission, Esoot, and mass fraction of acetylene C2H2, YC2H2, on the x–y plane in case of ϕ = 0.91, together with direct photographs taken in the experiments. The color range of black to white in C2H2 corresponds to 0–2.0 × 10−2 (-). (a) Esoot with gaseous temperature, (b) C2H2, (c) experiment.

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Fig. 19

Distributions of predicted instantaneous soot radiation energy emission, Esoot, and mass fraction of acetylene C2H2, YC2H2, on the x–y plane in cases of ϕ = 1.09, together with direct photographs taken in the experiments. The color range in C2H2 is as in Fig. 18. (a) Esoot with gaseous temperature, (b) C2H2, (c) experiment.

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Fig. 20

Distributions of predicted instantaneous soot radiation energy emission, Esoot, and mass fraction of acetylene C2H2, YC2H2, on the x–y plane in cases of ϕ = 1.29, together with direct photographs taken in the experiments. The color range in C2H2 is as in Fig. 18. (a) Esoot with gaseous temperature, (b) C2H2, (c) experiment.

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