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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Combustion, Fuels, and Emissions

Numerical Study on the Effect of Real Syngas Compositions on Ignition Delay Times and Laminar Flame Speeds at Gas Turbine Conditions

[+] Author and Article Information
Olivier Mathieu

e-mail: olivier.mathieu@tamu.edu

Eric L. Petersen

e-mail: epetersen@tamu.edu
Texas A&M University,
College Station, TX 77843

Alexander Heufer

e-mail: aheufer@gmx.de

Nicola Donohoe

e-mail: n.donohoe1@nuigalway.ie

Wayne Metcalfe

e-mail: waynemetcalfe@gmail.com

Henry J. Curran

e-mail: henry.curran@nuigalway.ie
National University of Ireland Galway,
Galway, Ireland

Felix Güthe

Alstom, Baden,
5242-CH Switzerland
e-mail: felix.guethe@power.alstom.com

Gilles Bourque

Rolls-Royce Canada,
Montreal, QC H8T 1A2, Canada
e-mail: gilles.bourque@rolls-royce.com

Contributed by the Combustion and Fuels Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received July 8, 2013; final manuscript received August 5, 2013; published online October 21, 2013. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 136(1), 011502 (Oct 21, 2013) (9 pages) Paper No: GTP-13-1243; doi: 10.1115/1.4025248 History: Received July 08, 2013; Revised August 05, 2013

Depending on the feedstock and the production method, the composition of syngas can include (in addition to H2 and CO) small hydrocarbons, diluents (CO2, water, and N2), and impurities (H2S, NH3, NOx, etc.). Despite this fact, most of the studies on syngas combustion do not include hydrocarbons or impurities and in some cases not even diluents in the fuel mixture composition. Hence, studies with realistic syngas composition are necessary to help in designing gas turbines. The aim of this work was to investigate numerically the effect of the variation in the syngas composition on some fundamental combustion properties of premixed systems such as laminar flame speed and ignition delay time at realistic engine operating conditions. Several pressures, temperatures, and equivalence ratios were investigated for the ignition delay times, namely 1, 10, and 35 atm, 900–1400 K, and ϕ = 0.5 and 1.0. For laminar flame speed, temperatures of 300 and 500 K were studied at pressures of 1 atm and 15 atm. Results showed that the addition of hydrocarbons generally reduces the reactivity of the mixture (longer ignition delay time, slower flame speed) due to chemical kinetic effects. The amplitude of this effect is, however, dependent on the nature and concentration of the hydrocarbon as well as the initial condition (pressure, temperature, and equivalence ratio).

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Determination method for the ignition delay time using the computed pressure profile

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Fig. 2

Comparison with the bio-syngas shock-tube results from Ref. [38] and models from the literature

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Fig. 3

Evolution of the ignition delay time with the temperature at 1, 10, and 35 atm and at ϕ = 0.5. Mixtures are 75/25 (Gray line) and 25/75 CO/H2 (mol) in air (black line).

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Fig. 4

Laminar flame speeds for the baseline bio-syngas and coal-syngas mixtures (bBiosyn and bCoalsyn) at 1 and 15 atm and inlet temperatures of 300 and 500 K, respectively

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Fig. 5

Effect of hydrocarbon addition on the ignition delay time of the bBiosyn mixture at 1 atm and at ϕ = 0.5

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Fig. 6

Effect of hydrocarbon addition on the ignition delay time of the bBiosyn mixture at 10 atm and at ϕ = 0.5

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Fig. 7

Effect of hydrocarbon addition on the ignition delay time of the bBiosyn mixture at 35 atm and at ϕ = 0.5

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Fig. 8

Laminar flame speed as a function of hydrocarbon addition for the baseline bio–syngas mixture (bBiosyn) at 1 atm and at an inlet temperature of 300 K

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Fig. 9

Laminar flame speed as a function of hydrocarbon addition for the baseline bio–syngas mixture (bBiosyn) at 15 atm and at an inlet temperature of 500 K

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Fig. 10

Laminar flame speed as a function of hydrocarbon addition for the baseline coal-syngas mixture (bCoalsyn) at 1 atm and at an inlet temperature of 300 K

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Fig. 11

Comparison between the ignition delay times of a baseline bio-derived syngas (50 H2/50 CO as fuel), bBiosyn, and of an averaged bio-derived syngas (H2/CO/CH4 as fuel plus water, CO2 and N2), Biosyn

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Fig. 12

Comparison between the ignition delay times of the Biosyn and Coalsyn mixtures at 1, 10, and 35 atm

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Fig. 13

Laminar flame speeds for the neat CO/H2 bio-syngas mixture (bBiosyn) and for the average bio-syngas mixture (Biosyn) at pressures of 1 and 15 atm and inlet temperatures of 300 and 500 K

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Fig. 14

Laminar flame speeds for the neat CO/H2 coal-syngas mixture (bCoalsyn) and for the average bio-syngas mixture (Coalsyn) at pressures of 1 and 15 atm and inlet temperatures of 300 and 500 K

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Fig. 15

Laminar flame speed for the averaged bio- and coal-syngas (Biosyn and Coalsyn, respectively) at various pressures and unburned gas temperature conditions

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Fig. 16

Flame temperature as a function of additive blend for bio-syngas at 1 atm and an inlet temperature of 300 K

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