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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Coal, Biomass, and Alternative Fuels

Comparative Study of Diesel Oil and Biodiesel Spray Combustion Based on Detailed Chemical Mechanisms

[+] Author and Article Information
Junfeng Yang

e-mail: jfyang521@gmail.com

Valeri I. Golovithcev

e-mail: valeri@chalmers.se

Chalmers University of Technology,
SE-412 96 Gothenburg, Sweden

Chitralkumar V. Naik

e-mail: CNaik@reactiondesign.com

Ellen Meeks

e-mail: EMeeks@reactiondesign.com

Reaction Design, Inc.,
5930 Cornerstone Court West, Suite 230,
San Diego, CA 92121

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Fuels and Combustion Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received December 27, 2012; final manuscript received July 16, 2013; published online November 21, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Stani Bohac.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 136(3), 031401 (Nov 21, 2013) (8 pages) Paper No: GTP-12-1497; doi: 10.1115/1.4025724 History: Received December 27, 2012; Revised July 16, 2013

In the present work, a semidetailed combustion mechanism for biodiesel fuel was validated against the measured autoignition delay times and subsequently implemented in the fortÉ cfd engine simulation package (Reaction Design Inc., 2010, “fortÉ, FOR-UG-40102-1009-UG-1b,” Reaction Design Inc., San Diego, CA) to investigate the spray characteristics (e.g., the liquid penetration and flame lift-off distances of rapeseed oil methyl ester (RME) fuel in a constant-volume combustion chamber). The modeling results were compared with the experimental data. Engine simulations were performed for a Volvo D12C heavy-duty diesel engine fueled by RME on a 72 deg sector mesh. Predictions were validated against measured in-cylinder parameters and exhaust emission concentrations. The semidetailed mechanism was shown to be an efficient and accurate representation of actual biodiesel combustion phases. Meanwhile, as a comparative study, the simulations based on a detailed diesel oil surrogate mechanism were performed for diesel oil under the same conditions.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

The autoignition delay times for (a) stoichiometric methyl oleate, diesel oil, n-heptane, and n-decane/air mixtures under pressures 13.5 atm; (b) and (c) stoichiometric and rich (ϕ = 1.5) methyl oleate, diesel oil, and methyl decanoate/air mixtures under pressure 16 atm. IDTs for n-heptane, n-decane, and methyl decanoate are experimental data by Refs. [8-10], respectively. IDTs for methyl oleate and diesel oil were predicted using 491- and 437-species mechanisms developed by present work and Ref. [11], respectively.

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Fig. 2

A section half-view of 360 deg full mesh for Chalmers HP/HT spray chamber. Region 1 for air inlet, region 2 for injector position, and region 3 for air outlet.

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Fig. 3

72 deg sector mesh for the Volvo D12C diesel engine at TDC

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Fig. 4

Comparison of measured and predicted liquid penetration for diesel oil and RME in the Chalmers HP/HT spray chamber at temperature 830 K and pressure 50 bar

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Fig. 5

Comparison of measured and predicted flame lift-offs for diesel oil and RME in the Chalmers HP/HT spray chamber at temperature 830 K and pressure 50 bar

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Fig. 6

The measured shadowgraphs with superimposed combustion radiation records and simulated temperature contours for the diesel oil and RME combustion at time instants 2.5 ms in Chalmers HP/HT spray chamber at temperature 830 K, pressure 50 bar

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Fig. 7

Computational domain for the Volvo D12C diesel engine at 7 CAD ATDC; dotted clusters represent injected fuel jet; arrows represent the in-cylinder air motion velocity vector. Left, the air motion; right, the in-cylinder temperature distribution.

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Fig. 8

Volvo D12C diesel engine modeling results; comparison of calculated and measured in-cylinder parameters: pressure and rate of heat release for (a) RME, (b) diesel oil for 25% engine load, 25% EGR level, and SOI = 2.3 CAD ATDC

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Fig. 9

Volvo D12C diesel engine modeling results: comparison of calculated in-cylinder parameters: (a) averaged in-cylinder temperature and (b) maximum in-cylinder temperature for a 25% engine load, 25% EGR level, and SOI = –2.3 CAD ATDC

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Fig. 10

Volvo D12C diesel engine modeling results: (a) NOx concentration distribution, (b) in-cylinder temperature distribution, (c) soot concentration distribution for a 25% engine load, 25% EGR level, and SOI = −2.3 CAD ATDC

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