0
Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Structures and Dynamics

Experimental Study of Adiabatic Two-Phase Flow in an Annular Channel Under Low-Frequency Vibration

[+] Author and Article Information
Shao-Wen Chen

School of Nuclear Engineering,
Purdue University,
West Lafayette, IN 47907
Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science,
Department of Engineering and System Science,
National Tsing Hua University,
Hsinch 30013, Taiwan
e-mail: chensw@mx.nthu.edu.tw

Mamoru Ishii

School of Nuclear Engineering,
Purdue University,
West Lafayette, IN 47907

Michitsugu Mori

Division of Energy and Environmental Systems,
Graduate School of Engineering,
Hokkaido University,
Spapporo 060-8628, Japan

Fumitoshi Watanabe

R&D Center,
Tokyo Electric Power Company,
Yokohama 230-8510, Japan

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Structures and Dynamics Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received June 7, 2013; final manuscript received August 26, 2013; published online November 14, 2013. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 136(3), 032501 (Nov 14, 2013) (11 pages) Paper No: GTP-13-1160; doi: 10.1115/1.4025726 History: Received June 07, 2013; Revised August 26, 2013

In order to investigate the possible effect of seismic vibration on two-phase flow dynamics and thermal-hydraulics of a nuclear reactor, experimental tests of adiabatic air-water two-phase flow under low-frequency vibration were carried out in this study. An eccentric cam vibration module operated at low motor speed (up to 390 rpm) was attached to an annulus test section which was scaled down from a prototypic boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assembly subchannel. The inner and outer diameters of the annulus are 19.1 mm and 38.1 mm, respectively. The two-phase flow operating conditions cover the ranges of 0.03 m/s ≤ 〈jg〉 ≤ 1.46 m/s and 0.25 m/s ≤ 〈jf〉 ≤ 1.00 m/s and the vibration displacement ranges from ±0.8 mm to ±22.2 mm. Steady-state area-averaged instantaneous and time-averaged void fraction were recorded and analyzed in stationary and vibration experiments. A neural network flow regime identification technique and fast Fourier transformation (FFT) analysis were introduced to analyze the flow regimes and void signals under stationary and vibration conditions. Experimental results reveal possible changes in flow regimes under specific flow and vibration conditions. In addition, the instantaneous void fraction signals were affected and shown by FFT analysis. Possible reasons for the changes include the applied high acceleration and induced void/flow structure changes at certain ports under the specific flow and vibration conditions.

Copyright © 2014 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Schematic of test facility

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Schematic of an instrumentation port (not to scale)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Drift flux plot for stationary test conditions

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Time-averaged area-averaged void fraction results

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Schematic of flow regime identification process [19]

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

FFT analysis for acceleration signals under vibration condition: E = 22.2 mm, ms = 120 rpm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Flow regime identification results for Port 6 (stationary conditions) on different flow regime maps: (a) Mishima–Ishii's map [23], (b) Kelessidis–Dukler's map [24], and (c) Das' map [25]

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Flow regime identification results for Port 4 (stationary conditions) on existing maps

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Flow regime identification results for Port 2 (stationary conditions) on existing maps

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Flow regime identification results for Port 6 at highest motor speed (ms = 120, 135, 390 rpm) conditions

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Flow regime identification results at Port 4 at highest motor speed (ms = 120, 135, 390 rpm) conditions

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Flow regime identification results at Port 2 at highest motor speed (ms = 120, 135, 390 rpm) conditions

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

Instantaneous void fraction and FFT analysis for test condition: 〈jf〉 = 0.5 m/s, 〈jg〉 = 0.57 m/s, stationary, at Port 6: (a) void signals, (b) FFT analysis

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 14

Instantaneous void fraction and FFT analysis for test condition: 〈jf〉 = 0.5 m/s, 〈jg〉 = 0.57 m/s, vibration (E = 22.2 mm, ms = 120 rpm), at Port 6: (a) void signals, and (b) FFT analysis

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 15

FFT analysis of void fraction signals for test condition: 〈jf〉 = 0.25 m/s, 〈jg〉 = 0.52 m/s, stationary, at Port 4

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 16

FFT analysis of void fraction signals for test condition: 〈jf〉 = 0.25 m/s, 〈jg〉 = 0.52 m/s, vibration (E = 15.9 mm, ms = 135 rpm), at Port 4

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In