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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Combustion, Fuels, and Emissions

Turbulent Consumption Speeds of High Hydrogen Content Fuels From 1–20 atm

[+] Author and Article Information
Prabhakar Venkateswaran

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Iowa State University,
Ames, IA 50011
e-mail: pv1@iastate.edu

Andrew D. Marshall

School of Mechanical Engineering,
Georgia Institute of Technology,
Atlanta, GA 30332
e-mail: andrew.marshall@gatech.edu

Jerry M. Seitzman

School of Aerospace Engineering,
Georgia Institute of Technology,
Atlanta, GA 30332
e-mail: jerry.seitzman@ae.gatech.edu

Tim C. Lieuwen

School of Aerospace Engineering,
Georgia Institute of Technology,
Atlanta, GA 30332
e-mail: tim.lieuwen@aerospace.gatech.edu

Contributed by the Combustion and Fuels Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received July 20, 2013; final manuscript received July 27, 2013; published online October 21, 2013. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 136(1), 011504 (Oct 21, 2013) (8 pages) Paper No: GTP-13-1271; doi: 10.1115/1.4025210 History: Received July 20, 2013; Revised July 27, 2013

This work describes measurements and analysis of the turbulent consumption speeds, ST,GC, of H2/CO fuel blends. We report measurements of ST,GC at pressures and normalized turbulence intensities, urms'/SL,0, up to 20 atm and 1800, respectively, for a variety of H2/CO mixtures and equivalence ratios. In addition, we present correlations of these data using laminar burning velocities of highly stretched flames, SL,max, derived from quasi-steady leading points models. These analyses show that SL,max can be used to correlate data over a broad range of fuel compositions but do not capture the pressure sensitivity of ST,GC. We suggest that these pressure effects are more fundamentally a manifestation of non-quasi-steady behavior in the mass burning rate at the flame leading points.

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Mixture stretch sensitivity for different H2/CO mixtures of constant SL,0 at 1 atm

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Fig. 2

Pressure effect on mixture stretch sensitivity for 50% H2 mixtures at constant SL,0

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Fig. 3

Schematic of the experimental facility

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Fig. 4

Location of all the data reported in this study (12 and 20 mm) on the Borghi–Peters diagram

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Fig. 5

ST,GC as a function urms' normalized by SL,0 at various mean flow velocities, H2/CO ratios, and pressures for the 12 mm diameter burner (see Table 1 for legend)

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Fig. 6

Ratio of ST,GC at 5 and 10 atm to 1 atm across the range of turbulence intensities investigated

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Fig. 7

Linear plot of ST,GC as function of urms' normalized by SL,0 at various mean flow velocities, H2/CO ratios, and pressures for the 20 mm diameter burner (see Tables 1 and 2 for the legend)

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Fig. 8

Log-log plot of ST,GC as function of urms' normalized by SL,0 at various mean flow velocities, H2/CO ratios, and pressures for the 20 mm diameter burner (see Tables 1 and 2 for the legend)

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Fig. 9

ST,GC as a function of urms' normalized by SL,max at various mean flow velocities, H2/CO ratios, and pressures using the 12 mm diameter burner (see Table 1 for the legend)

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Fig. 10

ST,GC as function of urms' normalized by SL,max for all the data obtained using the 20 mm diameter burner at 1 atm (see Tables 1 and 2 for the legend)

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Fig. 11

ST,GC as function of urms' normalized by SL,max for all the data obtained using the 20 mm diameter burner at 1 atm (see Table 2 for the legend)

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Fig. 12

Dependence of ST,GC/SL,max upon τSL,max/τflow at fixed turbulence intensities, urms'/SL,max = 3.5 and 6.5 for the 12 mm diameter burner where τflow is scaled as D/U0 = τB

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Fig. 13

Dependence of ST,GC/SL,max upon τSL,max/τflow at fixed turbulence intensities, urms'/SL,max = 3.5 and 6.5 for the 12 mm diameter burner where τflow is scaled as lλ/urms' = τλ

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Fig. 14

Dependence of ST,GC/SL,max upon τSL,max/τflow at fixed turbulence intensities, urms'/SL,max = 5 and 14 for the 20 mm diameter burner where τflow is scaled as D/U0=τB

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Fig. 15

Dependence of ST,GC/SL,max upon τSL,max/τflow at fixed turbulence intensities, urms'/SL,max = 5 and 14 for the 20 mm diameter burner where τflow is scaled as lλ/urms' = τλ

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Fig. 16

ST,GC as function of urms' normalized by SL,0 for the constant SL,0 studies using the 20 mm diameter burner (see Table 1 for the legend)

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Fig. 17

ST,GC as function of urms' normalized by SL,0 for the varying SL,0 studies for H2 = 30% mixture using the 20 mm diameter burner (see Table 2 for legend)

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Fig. 18

ST,GC as function of urms' normalized by SL,0 for the varying SL,0 studies for H2 = 60% mixture using the 20 mm diameter burner (see Table 2 for legend)

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