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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Combustion, Fuels, and Emissions

Controlling Plane-Jet Flame by a Fluidic Oscillation Technique

[+] Author and Article Information
Hsiu F. Yang

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
National Taiwan University of
Science and Technology,
Taipei, Taiwan 10672, China

Ching M. Hsu

Graduate Institute of Applied
Science and Technology,
National Taiwan University of
Science and Technology,
Taipei, Taiwan 10672, China

Rong F. Huang

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
National Taiwan University of
Science and Technology,
Taipei, Taiwan 10672, China
e-mail: rfhuang@mail.ntust.edu.tw

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the International Gas Turbine Institute (IGTI) of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received June 26, 2012; final manuscript received November 2, 2013; published online December 10, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Joseph Zelina.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 136(4), 041501 (Dec 10, 2013) (10 pages) Paper No: GTP-12-1225; doi: 10.1115/1.4025928 History: Received June 26, 2012; Revised November 02, 2013

A plane-jet flame was manipulated by passing the fuel jet through a jet-impingement fluidic oscillator. The plane fuel jet bifurcated into two streams of self-sustained pulsating jets in the cavity of the fluidic oscillator and issued out of two slits on the exit plane of the fluidic oscillator. The oscillation of the bifurcated plane fuel jets caused the flame behavior and combustion characteristics to change significantly compared with the corresponding behavior and characteristics of a nonoscillating plane-jet flame. The oscillation frequency, flame behavior, thermal structure, and combustion-product distributions of the fluidic-oscillator flame were experimentally examined and compared with the nonoscillating plane-jet flame. The flame behavior was studied with instantaneous and long-exposure photography. The temperature distributions were measured with a fine-wire thermocouple. The combustion-product concentrations were detected with a gas analyzer. The results showed that the length and width of the fluidic-oscillator flame were reduced by approximately 45% and enlarged by approximately 40%, respectively, compared with the length and width of the nonoscillating plane-jet flame. The transverse temperature profiles of the fluidic-oscillator flame presented a wider spread than did the plane-jet flame. The fluidic-oscillator flame’s maximum temperature was approximately 100 °C higher than that of the plane-jet flame. The fluidic-oscillator flame presented a larger CO2 concentration and a smaller unburned C3H8 concentration than did the plane-jet flame. The experimental results indicated that the combustion in the fluidic-oscillator flame was more complete than that in the plane-jet flame.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Experimental setups. (a) Jet-impingement fluidic-oscillator burner, (b) plane-jet burner.

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Fig. 2

Time histories and power spectrum density functions of jets issued out of fluidic-oscillator burner (a) and (b) and plane-jet burner (c) and (d). Rec = 2679.

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Fig. 3

Instabilities induced by jet-impingement fluidic oscillator; (a) frequencies, (b) Strouhal numbers

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Fig. 4

Typical flame appearances near exit of fluidic-oscillator burner. (a) Attached flame, (b) transitional flame, (c) lifted flame. Exposure time 1 ms.

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Fig. 5

Typical flame appearances near exit of plane-jet burner. (a) Attached flame, (b) transitional flame, (c) lifted flame. Exposure time 1 ms.

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Fig. 6

Typical full-length flame appearances of fluidic-oscillator burner. (a)–(c) Instantaneous flame appearances, exposure time 1 ms, (d)–(f) time-averaged flame appearances, exposure time 1 s.

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Fig. 7

Typical full-length flame appearances of plane-jet burner. (a)–(c) Instantaneous flame appearances, exposure time 1 ms, (d)–(f) time-averaged flame appearances, exposure time 1 s.

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Fig. 8

Nondimensional flame length. (a) Fluidic-oscillator and double-jet flames, (b) plane-jet flame.

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Fig. 9

Nondimensional flame width at various attitudes. (a) Fluidic-oscillator flame, (b) plane-jet flame.

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Fig. 10

Transverse temperature distributions at various attitudes at Rec = 957. (a) Fluidic-oscillator flame, (b) plane-jet flame.

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Fig. 11

Temperature distributions along central axis. (a) Fluidic-oscillator flame, (b) plane-jet flame.

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Fig. 12

Combustion-product concentration distributions of fluidic-oscillator flame. Rec = 957. (a) Carbon dioxide, (b) carbon monoxide, (c) unburned propane, (d) oxygen.

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Fig. 13

Combustion-product concentration distributions of plane-jet flame. Rec = 957. (a) Carbon dioxide, (b) carbon monoxide, (c) unburned propane, (d) oxygen.

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