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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Structures and Dynamics

The Effects of Piston Skirt Profiles on Secondary Motion and Friction

[+] Author and Article Information
Ozgur Gunelsu

Mechanical Engineering Department,
Istanbul Technical University,
Gumussuyu, Istanbul 34437, Turkey

Ozgen Akalin

Mechanical Engineering Department,
Istanbul Technical University,
Gumussuyu, Istanbul 34437, Turkey
e-mail: akalin@itu.edu.tr

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Structures and Dynamics Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received December 11, 2012; final manuscript received January 7, 2014; published online January 31, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Song-Charng Kong.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 136(6), 062503 (Jan 31, 2014) (8 pages) Paper No: GTP-12-1484; doi: 10.1115/1.4026486 History: Received December 11, 2012; Revised January 07, 2014

Piston skirt form deviating from a perfect cylinder is investigated numerically for an improved frictional performance. Three features defining the barrel and oval form of the skirt are compared in the search for lower friction power loss. Radius of curvature around the bulge of the barrel is changed to obtain a flatter or more-rounded lubricated area with respect to a hot-piston profile as well as the axial location of this bulge. On the other hand, the circumferential variation in the separation between the skirt and cylinder wall is represented by an elliptical piston and the aspect ratio is varied for comparison. These different skirt profiles are used in a developed piston secondary dynamics model solving for the lateral movement of the piston by calculating the hydrodynamic and boundary normal forces acting on the piston together with friction. Finally, an improved skirt profile is suggested to obtain better frictional efficiency.

Copyright © 2014 by ASME
Topics: Friction , Pistons , Cylinders
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References

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Zhu, D., Cheng, H. S., Arai, T., and Hamai, K., 1992, “A Numerical Analysis for Piston Skirts in Mixed Lubrication—Part I: Basic Modeling,” ASME J. Tribol., 114(3), pp. 553–562. [CrossRef]
Keribar, R., and Dursunkaya, Z., 1992, “A Comprehensive Model of Piston Skirt Lubrication,” SAE Paper No. 920483. [CrossRef]
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Figures

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Fig. 1

Free-body diagram and geometry of the piston

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Fig. 2

Change in barrel profile of a hot piston running at 2200 rpm, full load

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Fig. 3

Temperature variation (°C) of hot piston for a quarter piston model

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Fig. 4

General view of mesh for a quarter piston model

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Fig. 5

Cylinder pressure variation

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Fig. 6

Skirt profiles based on the change in barrel form

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Fig. 7

Displacement of piston pin center from cylinder axis and tilt for the change in barrel form

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Fig. 8

Minimum film thickness variation for the change in barrel form

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Fig. 9

Thrust-force components for the change in barrel form

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Fig. 10

Friction force for the change in barrel form

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Fig. 11

Skirt profiles based on the change in the barrel peak position

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Fig. 12

Displacement of piston pin center from cylinder axis and tilt for the change in the barrel peak position

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Fig. 13

Minimum film thickness variation for the change in the barrel peak position

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Fig. 14

Thrust force components for the change in the barrel peak position

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Fig. 15

Friction force for the change in the barrel peak position

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Fig. 16

Skirt profiles based on the change in oval form

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Fig. 17

Displacement of piston pin center from cylinder axis and tilt for the change in oval form

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Fig. 18

Minimum film thickness variation for the change in oval form

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Fig. 19

Deformation (μm) at the major thrust side at 395 deg crank angle for the change in oval form

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Fig. 20

Thrust force components for the change in oval form

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Fig. 21

Friction force for the change in oval form

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Fig. 22

Friction force for the recommended skirt profile

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