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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Structures and Dynamics

The Maximum Allowable Misalignment in Hydrodynamic Rolling Hybrid Bearings

[+] Author and Article Information
Dun Lu

State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing
Systems Engineering,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an 710054, China
e-mail: dunn.lui@gmail.com

Wanhua Zhao

State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing
Systems Engineering,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an 710054, China
e-mail: whzhao@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

Bingheng Lu

State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing
Systems Engineering,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an 710054, China
e-mail: bhlu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

Jun Zhang

State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing
Systems Engineering,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an 710054, China
e-mail: junzhang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Structures and Dynamics Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received December 12, 2013; final manuscript received January 21, 2014; published online March 13, 2014. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 136(8), 082501 (Mar 13, 2014) (6 pages) Paper No: GTP-13-1450; doi: 10.1115/1.4026905 History: Received December 12, 2013; Revised January 21, 2014

A hydrodynamic rolling hybrid bearing (HRHB) assembled coaxially by a rolling bearing and hydrodynamic bearing is developed to achieve two functions at low and high speeds. At low speeds, the rolling bearing of the HRHB can be utilized to avoid wear in the hydrodynamic bearing. While at high speeds, the rotor is entirely supported by the hydrodynamic bearing, keeping away the interference of the rolling bearing. However, because the HRHB is mounted coaxially by two bearings, a misalignment cannot be avoided. This can lead two unexpected consequences: either the malfunction of the rolling bearing at low speeds or the interference of rolling bearing applied on the rotor. In this paper, a computational method to calculate the maximum allowable misalignment based on the noninterference conditions of the locus of the shaft center and rolling bearing at high speeds is proposed, and the influence of the rotating speed, the spindle, and bearing structural parameters on the maximum allowable misalignment is also analyzed. The results show that the locus of the maximum allowable misalignment forms a circle along the circumferential direction. The noninterference conditions are satisfied when the maximum allowable misalignment is inside the circle.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Structure of hydrodynamic rolling hybrid bearing

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Fig. 2

Relationship of the maximum allowable misalignment and the locus of the shaft center

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Fig. 3

FEM dynamic model of the HRHB-rotor system

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Fig. 4

Variation of the maximum allowable misalignment in different rotating speed

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Fig. 5

Variation of the maximum allowable misalignment in different disturbing force amplitude

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Fig. 6

Variation of the maximum allowable misalignment in different length of span

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Fig. 7

Variation of the maximum allowable misalignment with different rotor diameter

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Fig. 8

Variation of the maximum allowable misalignment with the change of the overhanging length

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Fig. 9

Variation of the maximum allowable misalignment circle as the rotor's diameter changes

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Fig. 10

Variation of the maximum allowable misalignment circle as the clearance ratio changes

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