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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Combustion, Fuels, and Emissions

Thermodynamic Considerations for Advanced, High Efficiency IC Engines

[+] Author and Article Information
Jerald A. Caton

Texas A&M University,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
College Station, TX 77843-3123
e-mail: jcaton@tamu.edu

Contributed by the Internal Combustion Engine Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received February 19, 2014; final manuscript received February 19, 2014; published online May 2, 2014. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 136(10), 101512 (May 02, 2014) (6 pages) Paper No: GTP-14-1114; doi: 10.1115/1.4027295 History: Received February 19, 2014; Revised February 19, 2014

Thermodynamics is the key discipline for determining and quantifying the elements of advanced engine designs, which lead to high efficiency. In spite of its importance, thermodynamics is often not given full consideration in understanding engine operation for high efficiency. By fully utilizing the first and second laws of thermodynamics, detailed understanding of the engine features that provide for high efficiency may be determined. Of all the possible features that contribute to high efficiency, the results of this study show that highly diluted engines with high compression ratios provide the greatest impact for high efficiencies. Other important improvements, which increase the efficiency include reduced heat losses, optimal combustion phasing, reduced friction, and reduced combustion duration. Thermodynamic quantification of these concepts is provided. For one comparison, the brake thermal efficiency increased from about 34% for the conventional engine to about 48% for the engine with one set of the above features. One aspect that contributes to these improvements is the importance of the increase of the ratio of specific heats. In addition, these design features often result in low emissions due to the low combustion temperatures.

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References

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Caton, J. A., 2014, “On the Importance of Specific Heats as Regards Efficiency Increases for Highly Dilute IC Engines,” Energy Conversion and Management, 79, pp. 146–160. [CrossRef]

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Net indicated and brake thermal efficiency as functions of equivalence ratio

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Net indicated and brake thermal efficiency as functions of EGR

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Net indicated and brake thermal efficiency as functions of compression ratio

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Net indicated and brake thermal efficiency as functions of the burn duration

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