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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Combustion, Fuels, and Emissions

A Study on Biodiesel NOx Emission Control With the Reduced Chemical Kinetics Model

[+] Author and Article Information
Juncheng Li

State Key Laboratory of Advanced Design
and Manufacturing for Vehicle Body,
Hunan University,
2 South Lushan Road,
Changsha 410082, China
Department of Mechanical Science
and Engineering,
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign,
1206 W. Green Street,
Urbana, IL 61801
e-mail: lijuncheng2013@163.com

Zhiyu Han

State Key Laboratory of Advanced Design
and Manufacturing for Vehicle Body,
Hunan University,
2 South Lushan Road,
Changsha 410082, China
Huai'an Industrial Technology Research Institute,
9 Yingbin Avenues,
Huai'an 223001, China
e-mail: zhiyuhan@yahoo.com

Cai Shen

Department of Mechanical Science
and Engineering,
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign,
1206 W. Green Street,
Urbana, IL 61801
e-mail: shencai02@gmail.com

Chia-fon Lee

Department of Mechanical Science
and Engineering,
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign,
1206 W. Green Street,
Urbana, IL 61801
Center for Combustion Energy,
Tsinghua University,
30 Shuangqing Road,
Beijing 100084, China
e-mail: cflee@illinois.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Combustion and Fuels Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received February 14, 2014; final manuscript received February 22, 2014; published online May 2, 2014. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 136(10), 101505 (May 02, 2014) (7 pages) Paper No: GTP-14-1089; doi: 10.1115/1.4027358 History: Received February 14, 2014; Revised February 22, 2014

In this paper, the effects of the start of injection (SOI) timing and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) rate on the nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions of a biodiesel-powered diesel engine are studied with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) coupling with a chemical kinetics model. The KIVA code coupling with a CHEMKIN-II chemistry solver is applied to the simulation of the in-cylinder combustion process. A surrogate biodiesel mechanism consisting of two fuel components is employed as the combustion model of soybean biodiesel. The in-cylinder combustion processes of the cases with four injection timings and three EGR rates are simulated. The simulation results show that the calculated NOx emissions of the cases with default EGR rate are reduced by 20.3% and 32.9% when the injection timings are delayed by 2- and 4-deg crank angle, respectively. The calculated NOx emissions of the cases with 24.0% and 28.0% EGR are reduced by 38.4% and 62.8%, respectively, compared to that of the case with default SOI and 19.2% EGR. But higher EGR rate deteriorates the soot emission. When EGR rate is 28.0% and SOI is advanced by 2 deg, the NOx emission is reduced by 55.1% and soot emission is controlled as that of the case with 24% EGR and default SOI. The NOx emissions of biodiesel combustion can be effectively improved by SOI retardation or increasing EGR rate. Under the studied engine operating conditions, introducing more 4.8% EGR into the intake air with unchanged SOI is more effective for NOx emission controlling than that of 4-deg SOI retardation with default EGR rate.

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Comparison of predicted pressure and AHHR with those of experiment, 19.2% EGR

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Comparison of the predicted NOx emissions with the experimental data, 19.2% EGR

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Comparison of the normalized soot emissions of the cases with 19.2% EGR

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Predicted volume averaged temperature and AHRR of the cases with 19.2% EGR

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

NOx emissions history and mass fractions of cells in the high temperature region

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Distributions of NOx mass fraction in the combustion chamber at 380 CAD

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Normalized NOx emission of the cases with higher EGR rates

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Simulated pressure and AHRR of the cases with higher EGR rates

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

NOx emissions history and mass fractions of cells in the high temperature region of the cases with higher EGR rates

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Normalized NOx emission of the cases with higher EGR rates

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