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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Combustion, Fuels, and Emissions

Diesel Engine Combustion Sensing Methodology Based on Vibration Analysis

[+] Author and Article Information
Ponti Fabrizio

University of Bologna,
Via Seganti 103,
Forli’ 47121,Italy
e-mail: fabrizio.ponti@unibo.it

Ravaglioli Vittorio

University of Bologna,
Via Seganti 103,
Forli’ 47121,Italy
e-mail: vittorio.ravaglioli2@unibo.it

Cavina Nicolò

University of Bologna
Viale Risorgimento 2,
Bologna 40136,Italy
e-mail: nicolo.cavina@unibo.it

De Cesare Matteo

Magneti Marelli Powertrain S.p.a.,
via del Timavo 33,
Bologna 40131,Italy
e-mail: matteo.decesare@magnetimarelli.com

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Combustion and Fuels Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received February 19, 2014; final manuscript received March 20, 2014; published online May 16, 2014. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 136(11), 111503 (May 16, 2014) (7 pages) Paper No: GTP-14-1113; doi: 10.1115/1.4027363 History: Received February 19, 2014; Revised March 20, 2014

The increasing request for pollutant emissions reduction spawned a great deal of research in the field of combustion control and monitoring. As a matter of fact, newly developed low temperature combustion strategies for diesel engines allow obtaining a significant reduction both in particulate matter and NOx emissions, combining the use of high EGR rates with a proper injection strategy. Unfortunately, due to their nature, these innovative combustion strategies are very sensitive to in-cylinder thermal conditions. Therefore, in order to obtain a stable combustion, a closed-loop combustion control methodology is needed. Many works demonstrate that a closed-loop combustion control strategy can be based on real-time analysis of in-cylinder pressure trace that provides important information about the combustion process, such as start of combustion, center of combustion and torque delivered by each cylinder. Nevertheless, cylinder pressure sensors on-board installation is still uncommon, due to problems related to unsatisfactory measurement long term reliability and cost. This paper presents a newly developed approach that allows extracting information about combustion effectiveness through the analysis of engine vibrations. In particular, the developed methodology can be used to obtain an accurate estimation of the indicated quantities of interest combining the information provided by engine speed fluctuations measurement and by the signals coming from acceleration transducers mounted on the engine. This paper also reports the results obtained applying the whole methodology to a light-duty turbocharged common rail diesel engine.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Accelerometer positioning on the engine under study

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Fig. 4

Coherence between in-cylinder pressure and accelerometer signal for a test run at 1500 rpm and bmep = 4 bar

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Fig. 3

Results obtained applying the complete indicated torque (Ti) and A50 estimation procedure to a ramp acceleration test

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Fig. 2

Order 2 transfer function (amplitude and phase) evaluated for the engine under study

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Fig. 11

Scheme of the complete remote combustion sensing methodology

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Fig. 6

Comparison between normalized NHRD and normalized accelerometer signal for a test run at 1500 rpm and bmep = 4 bar

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Fig. 5

Comparison between normalized RoHR and normalized accelerometer for a test run at 1500 rpm and bmep = 4 bar

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Fig. 7

Comparison between normalized NHRD and normalized accelerometer after delay compensation for a test run at 1500 rpm and bmep = 4 bar

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Fig. 8

Identification of the corresponding positions of interest for accelerometer and apparent heat release

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Fig. 9

Pressure peak position estimation with and without delay compensation for all the tests run at 1500 or 2000 rpm and bmep = 4 bar

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Fig. 10

SOC Main estimation with and without delay compensation for all the tests run at 1500 or 2000 rpm and bmep = 4 bar

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