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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Structures and Dynamics

Metal Temperature Correlations in Tilting Pad Journal Bearings

[+] Author and Article Information
Manish R. Thorat

Product Development,
Elliott Group,
901 North Fourth Street,
Jeannette, PA 15644
e-mail: mthorat@elliott-turbo.com

Brian C. Pettinato

Product Development,
Elliott Group,
901 North Fourth Street,
Jeannette, PA 15644
e-mail: bpettina@elliott-turbo.com

Pranabesh De Choudhury

Pran RDA Consulting,
Greensburg, PA 15601
e-mail: pranabeshd@hotmail.com

Contributed by the Structures and Dynamics Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received January 24, 2014; final manuscript received April 8, 2014; published online May 16, 2014. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 136(11), 112503 (May 16, 2014) (7 pages) Paper No: GTP-14-1047; doi: 10.1115/1.4027416 History: Received January 24, 2014; Revised April 08, 2014

The predicted and measured bearing metal temperatures of tilting-pad journal bearings are examined. All bearings are a five-pad design with load-between-pad orientation. The two loaded pads in each bearing are instrumented with a resistance temperature detector (RTD). The bearing pad metal temperatures are measured as a part of the ISO 10439 (API 617) mechanical test requirement. Bearing pad metal temperatures are predicted using the thermoelastohydrodynamic (TEHD) analysis method. One particular bearing size 4 in. (101.6 mm) in diameter and 1.54 in. (39.12 mm) in the axial length is examined with respect to the tolerance range influence on the predicted pad metal temperatures including the effect of bearing assembled clearance and preloads. A range of loads and speeds are investigated. The temperature variation observed for this bearing size is compared against the variation in the measured temperature data for three other bearing sizes (bearing sizes are denoted by diameter × axial length) 2.95 in. (74.9 mm) × 1.02 in. (25.9 mm), 6 in. (152.4 mm) × 3 in. (76.2 mm), and 8 in. (203.2 mm) × 7 in. (177.8 mm).

Copyright © 2014 by ASME
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References

ANSI/API, 2005, “Petroleum, Petrochemical and Natural Gas Industries—Steam Turbines—Special-Purpose Applications,” 6th ed., American Petroleum Institute, Washington, DC, ANSI/API Standard No. 612/ISO 10437.
API, 2002, “Axial and Centrifugal Compressors and Expander-Compressors for Petroleum, Chemical and Gas Industry Services,” 7th ed., American Petroleum Institute, Washington, DC, API Standard No. 617.
Pettinato, B. C. and DeChoudhury, P., 2007, “Bearing Metal Temperature Correlation Study in Five Shoe Tilting Pad Spherically Seated Journal Bearings,” 62nd Society of Tribologists and Lubrication Engineers (STLE) Annual Meeting and Exhibition, Philadelphia, PA, May 6–10.
Branagan, L. A. and Barrett, L. E., 1998, “Influence of Cross-Film Viscosity Variation on Conduction Effects in Journal Bearings,” Tribol. Trans., 41(4), pp. 513–518. [CrossRef]
Branagan, L. A., 1988, “Thermal Analysis of Fixed and Tilting Pad Journal Bearings Including Cross-Film Viscosity Variations and Deformation,” Ph.D. dissertation, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA.
Fillon, M. and Khonsari, M., 1996, “Thermohydrodynamic Design Charts for Tilting-Pad Journal Bearings,” ASME J. Tribol., 118(1), pp. 232–238. [CrossRef]
He, M., 2003, “Thermoelastohydrodynamic Analysis of Fluid Film Journal Bearings,” Ph.D. dissertation, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA.
API, 2000, “Machinery Protection Systems,” 4th ed., American Petroleum Institute, Washington, DC, API Standard No. 670.
He, M., Allaire, P., and Cloud, H., 2003, “MAXBRG User's Manual,” University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, ROMAC Report No. 496.
Brockwell, K., DeCamillo, S., and Dmochowski, W., 2001, “Measured Temperature Characteristics of 152 mm Diameter Pivoted Shoe Journal Bearings With Flooded Lubrication,” Tribol. Trans., 44(4), pp. 543–550. [CrossRef]

Figures

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Fig. 1

Tilting pad journal bearing with spherical seat pivots; load between pads orientation

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Fig. 2

Bearing assembled clearance and machined clearance

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Fig. 3

Contour plot of the temperature difference (°F) predicted at the RTD probe location between the minimum clearance/maximum preload and maximum clearance/minimum preload case as a function of the surface speed and unit load

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Fig. 4

Contour plot of the predicted temperature difference (°F) between the maximum Babbitt temperature and the RTD probe tip temperature for the minimum clearance/maximum preload as a function of the surface speed and unit load

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Fig. 5

Contour plot of the predicted temperature difference (°F) between the tolerance range of 0.07 in. (1.778 mm) to 0.10 in. (2.54 mm) radial depth from the Babbitt surface

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Fig. 6

Projected view of the prediction surface with the measured temperature rise for the 4 in. × 1.54 in. (101.6 mm × 39.12 mm) size bearing; Babbitt on steel pads

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Fig. 7

Residual of the measured temperature rise from the predicted temperature rise as a function of the (a) surface speed, and (b) bearing unit load for the 4 in. × 1.54 in. (101.6 mm × 39.12 mm) size bearing; Babbitt on steel pads

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Fig. 8

Frequency distribution of residuals (measured temperature rise minus predicted temperature rise) for the 4 in. × 1.54 in. (101.6 mm × 39.12 mm) size bearing

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Fig. 9

Projected view of the prediction surface with the measured temperature rise for the 4 in. × 1.54 in. (101.6 mm × 39.12 mm) size bearing; Babbitt on chromium copper

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Fig. 10

Residual of the measured temperature rise from the predicted temperature rise as a function of the (a) surface speed, and (b) bearing unit load for the 4 in. × 1.54 in. (101.6 mm × 39.12 mm) size bearing; Babbitt on chromium copper pads

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Fig. 11

Frequency distribution of residuals (measured temperature rise minus predicted temperature rise) for the 4 in. × 1.54 in. (101.6 mm × 39.12 mm) size bearing; Babbitt on chromium copper pads

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Fig. 12

Projected view of the prediction surface with the measured temperature rise for bearing A (2.95 in. × 1.02 in./ 74.9 mm × 25.9 mm size bearing)

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Fig. 13

Projected view of the prediction surface with the measured temperature rise for bearing B (6 in. × 3 in./152.4 mm × 76.2 mm size bearing)

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Fig. 14

Projected view of the prediction surface with the measured temperature rise for bearing C (8 in. × 7 in./203.2 mm × 177.8 mm size bearing)

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Fig. 15

Residual of the measured temperature rise from the predicted temperature rise as a function of the (a) surface speed, and (b) bearing unit load for bearing A (2.95 in. × 1.02 in./74.9 mm × 25.9 mm size bearing)

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Fig. 16

Residual of the measured temperature rise from the predicted temperature rise as a function of the (a) surface speed, and (b) bearing unit load for bearing B (6 in. × 3 in.152.4 mm × 76.2 mm size bearing)

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Fig. 17

Residual of the measured temperature rise from the predicted temperature rise as a function of the (a) surface speed, and (b) bearing unit load for bearing C (8 in. × 7 in./203.2 mm × 177.8 mm size bearing)

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Fig. 18

Frequency distribution of residuals (measured temperature rise minus predicted temperature rise) for bearing A (2.95 in. × 1.02 in./74.9 mm × 25.9 mm size bearing)

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Fig. 19

Frequency distribution of residuals (measured temperature rise minus predicted temperature rise) for bearing B (6 in. × 3 in./152.4 mm × 76.2 mm size bearing)

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Fig. 20

Frequency distribution of residuals (measured temperature rise minus predicted temperature rise) for bearing C (8 in. × 7 in./203.2 mm × 177.8 mm size bearing)

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