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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Manufacturing, Materials, and Metallurgy

Experimental and Modeling Study of the Effect of Manufacturing Deviations on the Flow Characteristics of Tangential Intake Port in a Diesel Engine

[+] Author and Article Information
Zhen Lu

State Key Laboratory of Engines,
Tianjin University,
Weijin Road 92,
Tianjin City 300072, China
e-mail: luzhen@tju.edu.cn

Tianyou Wang

State Key Laboratory of Engines,
Tianjin University,
Weijin Road 92,
Tianjin City 300072, China
e-mail: wangtianyou@tju.edu.cn

Shuliang Liu

State Key Laboratory of Engines,
Tianjin University,
Weijin Road 92,
Tianjin City 300072, China
e-mail: liushu_liang@126.com

Zhiqiang Lin

Yuchai Machinery Company Limited,
Tianqiao West Road 88,
Yulin City, Guangxi 537005, China
e-mail: jiesu3000@163.com

Yiyong Han

Yuchai Machinery Company Limited,
Tianqiao West Road 88,
Yulin City, Guangxi 537005, China
e-mail: thsunyz@163.com

Contributed by the Manufacturing Materials and Metallurgy Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received March 8, 2014; final manuscript received April 3, 2014; published online May 16, 2014. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 136(11), 112101 (May 16, 2014) (9 pages) Paper No: GTP-14-1146; doi: 10.1115/1.4027557 History: Received March 08, 2014; Revised April 03, 2014

The intake port flow characteristics in an internal combustion engine significantly affect its power output, fuel economy, and emissions. To optimize the flow characteristics in the intake port, increasing attention has been paid to its design process. However, the casting and machining processes of the intake port are underappreciated, which may introduce significant deviations, leading to undesirable variation of intake port flow and subsequent deterioration in engine combustion and emissions. In this paper, steady flow tests were carried out on a four-valve diesel engine to investigate how and to what extent the casting and machining deviations of the intake port influence the in-cylinder flow characteristics. The results show that these deviations lead to the variation of swirl ratio up to 20%. Then, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation was conducted for understanding the reason. It is indicated that higher tolerance is needed during the casting and machining processes. For example, in order to control the variation of swirl ratio within 10%, the inclined angle should be controlled at less than 1 deg, the eccentric distance should be restricted to less than 0.5 mm, and the swelling thickness should be limited to less than 1 mm.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

The port performance in diesel engines measured by steady flow bench

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Fig. 2

Intake valve profile

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Fig. 4

Completed flow box assembly

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Fig. 5

Sketch of the inclined port (the cross section on the left was located at the two axes of the valve seats)

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Fig. 6

Sketch of the eccentric port (the cross section on the left was located at the two axes of the valve seats)

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Fig. 7

Sketch of the swelling port

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Fig. 8

Performance of the standard ports

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Fig. 9

Performance of the inclined ports

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Fig. 10

Resolution of velocity in cylinder

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Fig. 11

Performance of the eccentric ports

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Fig. 12

Performance of the swelling ports

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Fig. 13

Trimmed cell used in the simulation

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Fig. 14

Comparison between the performance of eccentric port measured at steady flow bench and the results calculated through numerical simulation (the valve lift is 10 mm)

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Fig. 15

Velocity distributions in the cylinder at the maximum valve lift

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Fig. 16

Performance of the eccentric ports (the positive value for swirl ratio means the air rotates clockwise around the cylinder at plain B and the negative value means the air rotates counterclockwise around the cylinder at plain B)

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