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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Turbomachinery

Fluid Properties at Gas Turbine Inlet Due to Fogging Considering Evaporation and Condensation Phenomena as Well as Icing Risk

[+] Author and Article Information
Christoph Günther

Helmut-Schmidt-University/University
of the Federal Armed Forces Hamburg,
Holstenhofweg 85,
Hamburg 22043, Germany
e-mail: guenther@hsu-hh.de

Franz Joos

Helmut-Schmidt-University/University
of the Federal Armed Forces Hamburg,
Holstenhofweg 85,
Hamburg 22043, Germany
e-mail: joos@hsu-hh.de

Contributed by the Turbomachinery Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received July 10, 2014; final manuscript received July 29, 2014; published online October 14, 2014. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 137(3), 032605 (Oct 14, 2014) (9 pages) Paper No: GTP-14-1359; doi: 10.1115/1.4028434 History: Received July 10, 2014; Revised July 29, 2014

This study reports on numerically calculated thermophysical properties of air entering a gas turbine compressor after passing through an intake duct affected by different cooling techniques. Case of reference is unaffected ambient air (referenced to as unaffected) passing the intake duct. Furthermore, ambient air cooled down to wet bulb temperature by (overspray) fogging (referenced to as wet) was considered. The third case shows air cooled down to the same temperature as it was reached in the wet case but by using chillers (referenced to as chilled). Equilibrium and nonequilibrium properties according to the occurring evaporation and condensation phenomena were compared. Equilibrium conditions seem to have a reduced inlet icing risk for the wet case compared to the chilled case. However, comparing the wet case to the unaffected case showed a higher icing risk for the wet case at low ambient relative humidity. In contrast to equilibrium conditions, a consideration of nonequilibrium conditions resulted in an increased icing risk due to almost negligible condensation rates.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Diameter of injected droplets versus number of droplets per class and versus the mass per droplet class

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Fig. 2

Schematic depiction of an intake duct used for a GT24/26 gas turbine showing ambient conditions and planes 1 and 2 [20]

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Fig. 3

Normalized area of intake duct and normalized flow velocity versus normalized position in the intake duct according to the unaffected case

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Fig. 4

Schematic model of an evaporating or condensating droplet

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Fig. 5

Partial and saturation pressure of the vapor versus normalized axial intake duct position for equilibrium consideration at an ambient temperature of 290 K and a relative humidity of 60%

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Fig. 6

Temperature development versus normalized intake duct position with equilibrium temperatures at the end of the intake duct for an ambient temperature of 290 K (lines without evaporation or condensation and marks consider condensation)

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Fig. 7

Wetbulb temperature versus ambient relative humidity for an ambient temperature of 290 K

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Fig. 8

Sensitivity analysis of compressor inlet temperature versus ambient relative humidity for the unaffected and the chilled case at an ambient temperature of 290 K

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Fig. 9

Sensitivity analysis of gas turbine inlet temperature versus ambient relative humidity for the wet case and considered equilibrium with an ambient temperature of 290 K

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Fig. 10

Development of relative humidity versus normalized axial intake duct position considering droplet evaporation and condensation (ambient 290 K and 60% of relative humidity)

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Fig. 11

Development of static temperature versus normalized axial intake duct position considering droplet evaporation and condensation

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