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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Combustion, Fuels, and Emissions

Numerical Simulations of a Turbulent High-Pressure Premixed Cooled Jet Flame With the Flamelet Generated Manifolds Technique

[+] Author and Article Information
Andrea Donini

Combustion Technology Group,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Eindhoven University of Technology,
Eindhoven 5600MB, The Netherlands
e-mail: A.Donini@tue.nl

Robert J. M. Bastiaans

Combustion Technology Group,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Eindhoven University of Technology,
Eindhoven 5600MB, The Netherlands
e-mail: R.J.M.Bastiaans@tue.nl

Jeroen A. van Oijen

Combustion Technology Group,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Eindhoven University of Technology,
Eindhoven 5600MB, The Netherlands
e-mail: J.a.v.Oijen@tue.nl

L. Philip H. de Goey

Combustion Technology Group,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Eindhoven University of Technology,
Eindhoven 5600MB, The Netherlands
e-mail: L.P.H.d.Goey@tue.nl

Contributed by the Combustion and Fuels Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received May 6, 2014; final manuscript received November 7, 2014; published online December 17, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Klaus Dobbeling.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 137(7), 071501 (Jul 01, 2015) (8 pages) Paper No: GTP-14-1226; doi: 10.1115/1.4029099 History: Received May 06, 2014; Revised November 07, 2014; Online December 17, 2014

In the present paper, a computational analysis of a high pressure confined premixed turbulent methane/air jet flames with heat loss to the walls is presented. In this scope, chemistry is reduced by the use of the flamelet generated manifold (FGM) method and the fluid flow is modeled in an large eddy simulation (LES) and Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) context. The reaction evolution is described by the reaction progress variable, the heat loss is described by the enthalpy and the turbulence effect on the reaction is represented by the progress variable variance. A generic lab scale burner for methane high-pressure (5 bar) high-velocity (40 m/s at the inlet) preheated jet is adopted for the simulations, because of its gas-turbine relevant conditions. The use of FGM as a combustion model shows that combustion features at gas turbine conditions can be satisfactorily reproduced with a reasonable computational effort. Furthermore, the present analysis indicates that the physical and chemical processes controlling carbon monoxide (CO) emissions can be captured only by means of unsteady simulations.

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References

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Representation of the laminar manifold. (a) Progress variable source term (kg m−3 s−1); (b) temperature (K); (c) density (kg m−3); and (d) enthalpy along the single flamelets composing the manifold.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

The convoluted shape for an adiabatic flamelet. (a) Progress variable source term and (b) CO mass fractions. Laminar (bold curve) and convoluted (dashed) at different levels of variance of the progress variable.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Overview of the domain by means of a time snapshot of the LES simulation with heat loss. The flame here is represented by an isosurface of progress variable (Y = 0.75), and colored as function of its source term (kg m−3 s−1).

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Thermal laminar flame thickness and reaction layer thickness as a function of the enthalpy of the flamelet

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Time snapshots of LES with heat loss inclusion, center-plane. (a) Progress variable; (b) enthalpy (J kg−1); (c) temperature (K); (d) hydroxyl mass fractions; (e) progress variable source term (kg m−3 s−1); and (f) progress variable time snapshot at the center-plane of LES with heat loss inclusion with isoline at h = hmin,flamelet. This figure displays the zone of the domain in which the subcooled region of the manifold is accessed.

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Fig. 6

Results comparison at different heights. (a) Axial velocity (m s−1); (b) transverse velocity (m s−1); (c) temperature (K); and (d) CO mass fractions. Bold lines represent LES with heat loss, dots RANS with heat loss, and dashes RANS without heat loss inclusion.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Hydroxyl mass fraction fields represented at the center plane. Experimental results (top), averaged LES (center), and RANS (bottom). Color bars are omitted for consistency with the experiments; however, the color scale range is defined by the maximum and minimum values locally in each figure.

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Fig. 8

CO mass fraction profiles from the LES. Comparison between instantaneous (a) and time-averaged (b) fields at the center plane.

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Fig. 9

Scatter plot representing the accesses to the manifold at a randomly chosen time snapshot, for each combination of the three control variables

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