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Technical Brief

Dynamic Experimental Investigations of a Bypass Dual Throat Nozzle

[+] Author and Article Information
Rui Gu

Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory
of Aerospace Power System,
Department of Power Engineering,
Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics (NUAA),
Jiangsu, China
e-mail: sz24zxdzb3@126.com

Jinglei Xu

Professor of NUAA,
Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory
of Aerospace Power System,
Department of Power Engineering,
Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics (NUAA),
Jiangsu, China
e-mail: xujl@nuaa.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Turbomachinery Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received October 31, 2014; final manuscript received November 16, 2014; published online January 28, 2015. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 137(8), 084501 (Aug 01, 2015) (6 pages) Paper No: GTP-14-1600; doi: 10.1115/1.4029391 History: Received October 31, 2014; Revised November 16, 2014; Online January 28, 2015

The bypass dual throat nozzle (BDTN) does not consume any secondary injection from the other part of the engine, while it can produce steady and efficient vectoring deflection similar to the conventional dual throat nozzle (DTN). A BDTN model has been designed and subjected to dynamic experimental study. The main results show that: (1) The frequency spectrums of the dynamic pressures are different between each thrust vector state. (2) The variation rates of dynamic vector of the new BDTN can reach as high as 50 deg/s, 40 deg/s, and 34 deg/s under nozzle pressure ratio NPR = 3, 5, and 10, separately. (3)The dynamic hysteresis time is less than 1 ms.

Copyright © 2015 by ASME
Topics: Pressure , Thrust , Nozzles
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References

Figures

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Fig. 2

Configuration of the experimental model

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Fig. 3

Blowdown wind tunnel facility

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Fig. 4

Pressure tap distributions on the BDTN model

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Fig. 5

Photograph of the experimental model

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Fig. 6

Photograph of the experimental model installed in the wind tunnel

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Fig. 7

Experimental schlieren image for NPR = 3. (a) With thrust vectored state and (b) without thrust vectored state.

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Fig. 8

Comparison of experimental and CFD prediction of static pressure data on the upper- and lower-walls of the cavity with NPR = 3

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Fig. 9

Dynamic pressure original data during the vector transient state (NPR = 3)

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Fig. 10

Dynamic pressure data at the maximum vector state by low-pass filter (NPR = 3)

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Fig. 11

Dynamic pressure data at the normal state by low-pass filter (NPR = 3)

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Fig. 12

The frequency spectrum at the maximum vector state (NPR = 3)

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Fig. 13

The frequency spectrum at the normal state (NPR = 3)

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Fig. 14

The dynamic pressure data in different frequency regions under different vector states. (a) The maximum vector state, 3600–3800 Hz and (b) the normal state, 3200–3400 Hz.

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Fig. 15

Dynamic pressure data (NPR = 3, operating frequency of controller is 0.677 Hz). (a) Dynamic pressure original data, (b) dynamic pressure data by low-pass filter, and (c) the frequency spectrum.

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Fig. 16

Dynamic pressure data (NPR = 5, operating frequency of controller is 0.677 Hz). (a) Dynamic pressure original data, (b) dynamic pressure data by low-pass filter, and (c) the frequency spectrum.

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Fig. 17

Dynamic pressure data (NPR = 10, operating frequency of controller is 0.677 Hz). (a) Dynamic pressure original data, (b) dynamic pressure data by low-pass filter, and (c) the frequency spectrum.

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