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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Combustion, Fuels, and Emissions

Performance of Multiple-Injection Dry Low-NOx Combustors on Hydrogen-Rich Syngas Fuel in an IGCC Pilot Plant

[+] Author and Article Information
Tomohiro Asai

Research & Development Center,
Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems, Ltd.,
832-2 Horiguchi Hitachinaka-shi,
Ibaraki 312-0034, Japan
e-mail: tomohiro3_asai@mhps.com

Satoschi Dodo

Hitachi Gas Turbine Engineering Department,
Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems, Ltd.,
3-1-1 Saiwai-cho Hitachi-shi,
Ibaraki 317-8511, Japan
e-mail: satoshi_dodo@mhps.com

Mitsuhiro Karishuku

Hitachi Gas Turbine Engineering Department,
Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems, Ltd.,
3-1-1 Saiwai-cho Hitachi-shi,
Ibaraki 317-8511, Japan
e-mail: mitsuhiro_karishuku@mhps.com

Nobuo Yagi

Hitachi Gas Turbine Engineering Department,
Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems, Ltd.,
3-1-1 Saiwai-cho Hitachi-shi,
Ibaraki 317-8511, Japan
e-mail: nobuo_yagi@mhps.com

Yasuhiro Akiyama

Research & Development Center,
Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems, Ltd.,
832-2 Horiguchi Hitachinaka-shi,
Ibaraki 312-0034, Japan
e-mail: yasuhiro_akiyama@mhps.com

Akinori Hayashi

Research & Development Center,
Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems, Ltd.,
832-2 Horiguchi Hitachinaka-shi,
Ibaraki 312-0034, Japan
e-mail: akinori_hayashi@mhps.com

Contributed by the Combustion and Fuels Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received December 20, 2014; final manuscript received January 6, 2015; published online February 18, 2015. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 137(9), 091504 (Sep 01, 2015) (11 pages) Paper No: GTP-14-1673; doi: 10.1115/1.4029614 History: Received December 20, 2014; Revised January 06, 2015; Online February 18, 2015

The successful development of coal-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology requires gas turbines capable of achieving the dry low nitrogen oxides (NOx) combustion of hydrogen-rich syngas fuels for low emissions and high plant efficiency. Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems, Ltd. (MHPS) has been developing a “multiple-injection burner” to achieve the dry low-NOx (DLN) combustion of hydrogen-rich syngas fuels. The purposes of this paper are to present the test results of a multican combustor equipped with multiple-injection burners in an IGCC pilot plant, and evaluate combustor performance by focusing on the effects of flame shapes. The syngas fuel produced in the plant contained approximately 50% carbon monoxide, 20% hydrogen, and 20% nitrogen by volume. In the tests, the combustor with slenderer flames achieved lower NOx emissions of 10.9 ppm (at 15% oxygen), reduced combustor liner and burner plate metal temperatures, and lowered combustion efficiency at the maximum gas turbine load. The test results showed that the slenderer flames were more effective in reducing NOx emissions and liner/burner plate metal temperatures. A comparison with the diffusion-flame combustor demonstrated that the multiple-injection combustors achieved the dry low-NOx combustion of the syngas fuel in the plant.

Copyright © 2015 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Multican combustor with multiple-injection burners. Front view of multican combustor and tube cross section of individual can combustor.

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Fig. 2

Detailed diagram of multiple-injection burners

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Fig. 3

Mixing process in a coaxial jet analyzed by LES

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Fig. 4

Operating principle of flame-lifting technology for a main burner

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Fig. 5

Fuel supply system

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Fig. 7

EAGLE pilot plant (photo courtesy of J-POWER)

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Fig. 8

Perforated plates with flame shapes (a) plate A and (b) plate B

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Fig. 9

Variations in NOx emissions at maximum load with outer-fuel ratio

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Fig. 10

Comparison of NOx emissions at maximum load between multiple-injection combustors and diffusion-flame combustor

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Fig. 11

Variations in combustion efficiency at maximum load with outer-fuel ratio

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Fig. 12

Variations in CO emissions at maximum load with outer-fuel ratio

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Fig. 13

Variations in maximum combustion oscillation amplitude at maximum load with outer-fuel ratio

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Fig. 14

Variations in maximum liner metal temperature at maximum load with outer-fuel ratio

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Fig. 15

Axial distribution of liner metal temperature at maximum load, F1 ratio of 10% and outer-fuel ratio of 80%

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Fig. 16

Variations in maximum burner plate metal temperature at maximum load with outer-fuel ratio

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Fig. 17

Variations in NOx emissions with gas turbine load (plate B)

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Fig. 18

Variations in combustion efficiency with gas turbine load (plate B)

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Fig. 19

Variations in maximum amplitude of combustion oscillation with gas turbine load (plate B)

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Fig. 20

Variations in maximum liner metal temperature with gas turbine load (plate B)

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Fig. 21

Variations in maximum burner plate metal temperature with gas turbine load (plate B)

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