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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Combustion, Fuels, and Emissions

Real-Time Control of Maximum Heat Release Rate and Its Influence on Emission Dispersions in Diesel Engines

[+] Author and Article Information
Seungsuk Oh

Advanced Engine System Development Team,
Corporate Research and Development Division,
Doosan Infracore,
489 Hwasu-dong, Injung-Ro, Dong-Gu,
Incheon 401-702, South Korea
e-mail: seungsuk.oh@doosan.com

Myoungho Sunwoo

Professor
Department of Automotive Engineering,
Hanyang University,
222 Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu,
Seoul 133-791, South Korea
e-mail: msunwoo@hanyang.ac.kr

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Combustion and Fuels Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received December 7, 2014; final manuscript received January 25, 2015; published online March 17, 2015. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 137(9), 091508 (Sep 01, 2015) (11 pages) Paper No: GTP-14-1654; doi: 10.1115/1.4029880 History: Received December 07, 2014; Revised January 25, 2015; Online March 17, 2015

Unexpected combustions dispersion due to variations in fuel quality, production tolerance, and aging of components results in the deterioration of engine performance and increases harmful emissions. Many researchers have studied real-time combustion monitoring and control to maintain performance even under undesirable or abnormal conditions. They have reported that the reduction of combustion dispersion is promising for the decrease of emissions dispersion. In this study, we control the maximum heat release (HR) to compensate for combustion dispersion and compared the relationship between before and after control. The maximum rate of heat release (ROHRmax) is an important parameter and is highly related to engine performance and emission level. The control experiments were carried out using a diesel engine at 1500 rpm and brake mean effective pressure (BMEP) of 400 kPa, while the engine parameters were varied. The varied parameters were fuel rail pressure, swirl valve, pilot injection timing, and duration. The experimental results showed that control of the ROHRmax has the potential for the reduction of the dispersions of particulate matter (PM) emission and combustion noise even in unexpected combustion environments.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Structure of the ROHRmax controller

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Fig. 2

Results of ROHRmax control according to fuel rail pressure changes: (a) without ROHRmax control and (b) ROHRmax control

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Fig. 3

Cylinder pressure, ROHR, HR, and NHR according to the changes in the fuel rail pressure: (a) without ROHRmax control and (b) ROHRmax control

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Fig. 4

The effect of ROHRmax control on emissions and combustion noise according to changes in the fuel rail pressure

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Fig. 5

Effect of ROHRmax control on the dispersion of NOx and PM emissions according to changes in the fuel rail pressure

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Fig. 6

Results of ROHRmax control according to the changes in the swirl valve open: (a) without ROHRmax control and (b) ROHRmax control

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Fig. 7

Cylinder pressure, ROHR, HR, and NHR according to the changes in the swirl valve open: (a) without ROHRmax control and (b) ROHRmax control

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Fig. 8

Emissions and combustion noise according to the changes in the swirl valve open

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Fig. 9

The effect of ROHRmax control on the dispersion of NOx and PM emissions according to the changes in the swirl valve open

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Fig. 10

The results of the ROHRmax control according to the changes in the pilot injection timing: (a) without ROHRmax control and (b) ROHRmax control

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Fig. 11

Cylinder pressure, ROHR, HR, and NHR according to the changes in the pilot injection timing: (a) without ROHRmax control and (b) ROHRmax control

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Fig. 12

Emissions and combustion noise according to the changes in the pilot injection timing

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Fig. 13

The effect of ROHRmax control on the dispersion of NOx and PM emissions according to the changes in the pilot injection timing

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Fig. 14

The results of ROHRmax control according to the changes in the pilot injection duration: (a) without ROHRmax control and (b) ROHRmax control

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Fig. 15

Cylinder pressure, ROHR, HR, and NHR according to the changes in the pilot injection duration: (a) without ROHRmax control and (b) ROHRmax control

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Fig. 16

Emissions and combustion noise according to the changes in the pilot injection duration

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Fig. 17

The effect of ROHRmax control on the dispersion of NOx and PM emissions according to the changes in the pilot injection duration

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