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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Combustion, Fuels, and Emissions

Misfire Detection of Spark Ignition Engines Using a New Technique Based on Mean Output Power

[+] Author and Article Information
M. Boudaghi

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
K. N. Toosi University of Technology,
Mollasadra Street,
Tehran 19991-43344, Iran
e-mail: mahdi_boodaghi@sina.kntu.ac.ir

M. Shahbakhti

Department of Mechanical
Engineering-Engineering Mechanics,
Michigan Technological University,
1400 Townsend Drive,
Houghton, MI 49931
e-mail: mahdish@mtu.edu

S. A. Jazayeri

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
K. N. Toosi University of Technology,
Mollasadra Street,
Tehran 19991-43344, Iran
e-mail: jazayeri@kntu.ac.ir

Load is estimated by ECU based on throttle opening angle.

Contributed by the Combustion and Fuels Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received July 8, 2014; final manuscript received February 9, 2015; published online March 24, 2015. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 137(9), 091509 (Sep 01, 2015) (9 pages) Paper No: GTP-14-1333; doi: 10.1115/1.4029914 History: Received July 08, 2014; Revised February 09, 2015; Online March 24, 2015

Control and detection of misfire are an essential part of on-board diagnosis (OBD) of modern spark ignition (SI) engines. This study proposes a novel model-based technique for misfire detection for a multicylinder SI engine. The new technique uses a dynamic engine model to determine mean output power, which is then used to calculate a new parameter for misfire detection. The new parameter directly relates to combustion period and is sensitive to engine speed fluctuations caused by misfire. The new technique requires only measured engine speed data and is computationally viable for use in a typical engine control unit (ECU). The new technique is evaluated experimentally on a four-cylinder 1.6-l SI engine. Three types of misfire are studied including single, continuous, and multiple-event. The steady-state and transient experiments were done for a wide range of engine speeds and engine loads, using a vehicle chassis dynamometer and on-road vehicle testing. The validation results show that the new technique is able to detect all three types of misfire with up to 94% accuracy during steady-state conditions. The new technique is augmented with a compensation factor to improve the accuracy of the technique for transient operations. The resulting technique is shown to be capable of detecting misfire during both transient and steady-state engine conditions.

Copyright © 2015 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

EMD techniques in literature

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Fig. 2

Common approaches in literature for EMD based on crankshaft speed measurements

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Fig. 9

MGS (filled bar lines) and MP values for 3250 rpm test data

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Fig. 8

Engine speed deviations and MP values for multi-misfires (type III—pattern 1, 3 cylinders) at 3520 rpm and 50% load

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Fig. 7

Engine speed deviations and MP values for multi-misfires (type III—pattern 1, 4 cylinders) at 3520 rpm and 50% load

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Fig. 6

Engine speed deviations and MP values for continues misfires (type II) at 3520 rpm and 50% load

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Fig. 5

Engine speed deviations and MP values for single misfires (type I) at 3520 rpm and 50% load

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Fig. 4

Patterns of misfire generation including: (a) single misfire, (b) continuous misfires, and (c) multiple periodic misfires

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Fig. 3

Overview of the experimental setup for misfire experiments

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Fig. 16

Engine speed variation and MP values for single misfires (type I) at 1250 rpm and 10% engine load

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Fig. 17

Engine speed variation and MP values for continuous misfires (type II) at 1250 rpm and 10% engine load

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Fig. 18

Engine speed variation and MP values for multiple misfires (type III-pattern 1,4 cylinders) at 1250 rpm and 10% engine load

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Fig. 19

Engine speed variation and MP values for multiple misfires (type III-pattern 1,3 cylinders) at 1250 rpm and 10% engine load

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Fig. 10

Vehicle transient test conditions: (a) engine speed and (b) engine load

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Fig. 11

MP value overlapped by MGS in transient urban driving conditions

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Fig. 13

Compensated MP (MPc) values for transient test data of Fig. 10

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Fig. 14

Compensated MP (MPc) values for misfire types (type I-a) and (type III-b) at 3520 rpm and 50% load

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Fig. 12

Close-up of calculated MP values (continues stair lines) overlapped by MGS (filled bar lines) for the third misfire generation set in Fig. 11

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Fig. 15

LU and MPc patterns for the third set of misfire generation in transient operation

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