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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Turbomachinery

Experimental Thermal Field Measurements of Film Cooling Above the Suction Surface of a Turbine Vane

[+] Author and Article Information
Willam R. Stewart

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
The University of Texas at Austin,
204 E Dean Keeton Street Stop C2200,
Austin, TX 78712
e-mail: stewart@ge.com

David G. Bogard

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
The University of Texas at Austin,
204 E Dean Keeton Street Stop C2200,
Austin, TX 78712
e-mail: dbogard@mail.utexas.edu

1Present address: GE Global Research, Niskayuna, NY 12309.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received November 29, 2014; final manuscript received January 31, 2015; published online April 28, 2015. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 137(10), 102604 (Oct 01, 2015) (10 pages) Paper No: GTP-14-1641; doi: 10.1115/1.4030263 History: Received November 29, 2014; Revised January 31, 2015; Online April 28, 2015

Two-dimensional thermal profiles were experimentally measured downstream of a single row of film cooling holes on both an adiabatic and a matched Biot number model turbine vane. The measurements were taken as a comparison to computational simulations of the same model and flow conditions. Previously, adiabatic and overall effectiveness comparisons have been made between experimental and computational data. To improve computational models of the evolution of a film cooling jet as it propagates downstream, the thermal field above the vane, not just the footprint on the vane surface, must be analyzed. This study expands these data to include 2D thermal fields above the vane at 0, 5, and 10 hole diameters downstream of the film cooling holes. Four blowing ratios were tested, M = 0.28, 0.65, 1.11, and 2.41. In each case, the computational jets remained colder than the experimental jets because they did not diffuse into the mainstream as quickly. In addition, the computational results for the higher two blowing ratios exhibited the effects of the kidney vortex commonly studied in film cooling, but the experimental thermal fields were not dominated by this vortex. Finally, in comparing results above adiabatic and matched Biot number models, these thermal fields allow for an accurate analysis of whether or not the adiabatic wall temperature was a reasonable estimate of the driving temperature for heat transfer.

Copyright © 2015 by ASME
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References

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Dees, J. E., Ledezma, G. A., Bogard, D. G., Laskowski, G. M., and Tolpadi, A. K., 2012, “Experimental Measurements and Computational Predictions for an Internally Cooled Simulated Turbine Vane,” ASME J. Turbomach., 134(6), p. 061003. [CrossRef]
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Mathew, S., Ravelli, S., and Bogard, D. G., 2013, “Evaluation of CFD Predictions Using Thermal Field Measurements on a Simulated Film Cooled Turbine Blade Leading Edge,” ASME J. Turbomach., 135(1), p. 011021 [CrossRef].
Dyson, T. E., Bogard, D. G., and Bradshaw, S. D., 2012, “Evaluation of CFD Simulations of Film Cooling Performance on a Turbine Vane Including Conjugate Heat Transfer Effects,” ASME Paper No. GT2012-69107. [CrossRef]
Dees, J. E., Ledezma, G. A., Bogard, D. G., and Laskowski, G. M., 2013, “Overall and Adiabatic Effectiveness Values on a Scaled Up, Simulated Gas Turbine Vane,” ASME J. Turbomach., 135(5), p. 051017. [CrossRef]
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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of turbine vane test section

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Fig. 2

Measured pressured distribution in comparison to CFD prediction of an infinite cascade [7]

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Fig. 3

Secondary coolant flow loop

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Fig. 4

Schematic of the model vane with internal and film cooling

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Fig. 5

Cross section of the mesh used by Dyson et al. [12]

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Fig. 6

Experimental and aero and thermal boundary layer measurements just upstream of the film cooling hole location

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Fig. 7

Example of test to test repeatability of θ measurements at x/d = 5, M = 0.65, z/d = 2

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Fig. 8

Contour plots of θ and η (not corrected for in wall conduction effects) showing good agreement at y/d = 0 and x/d = 5

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Fig. 9

Laterally averaged ϕ or η with M = 0.65 [12]

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Fig. 10

Contour plots of ϕ and η with M = 0.65 [12]

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Fig. 11

Comparison of CFD simulations of an (a) adiabatic wall and a (b) low thermal conductivity wall [12]

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Fig. 12

Experimental thermal fields at x/d = 0

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Fig. 13

Experimental and computational [12] thermal fields above the adiabatic and conducting vane surfaces at x/d = 5 and 10, M = 0.28

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Fig. 14

Centerline profiles of θ, z/d = 2, x/d = 5, M = 0.28

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Fig. 15

Centerline profiles of θ, z/d = 2, x/d = 10, M = 0.28

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Fig. 16

Experimental and computational [12] thermal fields above the adiabatic and conducting vane surfaces at x/d = 5 and 10, M = 0.65

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Fig. 17

Centerline profiles of θ at x/d = 5 and M = 0.65 comparing experimental measurements and computational predictions [12]

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Fig. 18

Centerline profiles of θ, z/d = 2, x/d = 5, M = 0.65

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Fig. 19

Centerline profiles of θ, z/d = 2, x/d = 10, M = 0.65

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Fig. 20

Experimental and computational [12] thermal fields above the adiabatic and conducting vane surfaces at x/d = 5 and 10, M = 1.11

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Fig. 21

Centerline profiles of θ, z/d = 2, x/d = 5, M = 1.11

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Fig. 22

Centerline profiles of θ, z/d = 2, x/d = 10, M = 1.11

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Fig. 23

Experimental and computational [12] thermal fields above the adiabatic and conducting vane surfaces at x/d = 5 and 10, M = 2.4

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Fig. 24

Computational adiabatic and overall effectiveness contour plots for M = 2.41 [12]

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Fig. 25

Centerline profiles of θ, z/d = 2, x/d = 5, M = 2.41

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Fig. 26

Centerline profiles of θ, z/d = 2, x/d = 10, M = 2.41

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