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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Structures and Dynamics

Transient Amplitude Amplification of Mistuned Blisks

[+] Author and Article Information
Marius Bonhage

Institute of Dynamics and Vibration Research,
Leibniz Universität Hannover,
Hanover 30163, Germany
e-mail: bonhage@ids.uni-hannover.de

Linus Pohle

Institute of Dynamics
and Vibration Research,
Leibniz Universität Hannover,
Hanover 30163, Germany

Lars Panning-von Scheidt

Institute of Dynamics and Vibration Research,
Leibniz Universität Hannover,
Hanover 30163, Germany

Jörg Wallaschek

Professor
Institute of Dynamics and Vibration Research,
Leibniz Universität Hannover,
Hanover 30163, Germany

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Structures and Dynamics Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received January 22, 2015; final manuscript received March 19, 2015; published online May 12, 2015. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 137(11), 112502 (Nov 01, 2015) (8 pages) Paper No: GTP-15-1024; doi: 10.1115/1.4030278 History: Received January 22, 2015; Revised March 19, 2015; Online May 12, 2015

This article discusses the problem of exceeding amplitudes of mistuned structures caused by accelerated traveling waves type excitation, i.e., traveling waves with time variant frequencies. These waves cause resonance passages of, e.g., rotating structures. To calculate the resonance passage a semi-analytical solution is proposed. Thus, high accuracy is guaranteed. The topic of exceeding amplitudes is initially approached by studying a discrete lumped mass model with detuned parameters. It can be shown that under certain circumstances the maximum amplitude of the transient resonance passage is even higher than the maximum amplitude of the steady-state solution. To investigate this phenomenon on a real bladed disk, the number of degrees of freedom of the blisk is reduced using component mode synthesis (CMS). By applying the semi-analytical solution to the reduced model, the envelopes of the vibration during resonance passage can be calculated. Processing extensive parametric studies it can be pointed out under which circumstances the probability rises that higher maximum amplitudes occur during resonance passage compared to steady-state conditions.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Lumped mass model to study accelerated traveling wave-like excitation on mistuned structures

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Fig. 2

(a) Comparison of the maximum steady-state solution and the maximum amplitude of the resonance passage of a stiffness mistuned model and (b) comparison between the transient and steady-state amplitudes at δmis=0.1,ɛ=0.5 Hz/s

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Fig. 3

(a) Influence of the sweep rate on the transient maximum amplitude and (b) comparison between the transient and steady-state amplitudes at δmis=0.02,ε=0.5 Hz/s

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Fig. 4

(a) Finite element model of the studied blisk and (b) detail of nodal diameter diagram, position of the force application and monitoring point

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Fig. 5

(a) Probability of the occurrence of TAMS, EO = 1, second bending; (b) amplification band; (c) example of TAMS occurrence at EO = 1 and σ2=10-3, different sweep velocities compared to the steady-state solution; (d) TAMS curve of maximum amplitude versus sweep rate of the transient solution; and (e) mistuning factors

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Fig. 6

Cumulative density curve of σ=2×10-5 at EO = 1 from Fig. 5

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Fig. 7

(a) Probability of occurrence of TAMS, EO = 10, first bending; (b) amplification band; (c) example of TAMS occurrence at EO = 10 and σ2=2×10-5: different sweep velocities compared to the steady-state solution (d) TAMS curve of maximum amplitude versus sweep rate of the transient solution, and (e) mistuning factors

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Fig. 8

Cumulative density curve of σ=2×10-5 at EO = 10 from Fig. 7

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