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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Combustion, Fuels, and Emissions

Improving the Efficiency of Low Temperature Combustion Engines Using a Chamfered Ring-Land

[+] Author and Article Information
Jae Hyung Lim

Engine Research Center,
University of Wisconsin–Madison,
1500 Engineering Drive,
Madison, WI 53706
e-mail: jlim33@wisc.edu

Rolf D. Reitz

Engine Research Center,
University of Wisconsin–Madison,
1500 Engineering Drive,
Madison, WI 53706
e-mail: reitz@engr.wisc.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Combustion and Fuels Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received March 8, 2015; final manuscript received March 25, 2015; published online May 12, 2015. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 137(11), 111509 (Nov 01, 2015) (8 pages) Paper No: GTP-15-1085; doi: 10.1115/1.4030284 History: Received March 08, 2015; Revised March 25, 2015; Online May 12, 2015

In the present study, a chamfered piston crown design was used in order to reduce unburned hydrocarbon (UHC) emissions from the ring-pack crevice. Compared to the conventional piston design, the chamfered piston showed 17–41% reduction in the crevice-borne UHC emissions in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion. Through parametric sweeps 6 mm was identified to be a suitable chamfer size and the mechanism of the UHC reduction was revealed. Based on the findings in this study, the chamfered piston design was also tested in dual-fuel reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) combustion. In the tested RCCI case using the chamfered piston the UHC and CO emissions were reduced by 79% and 36%, respectively, achieving 99.5% combustion efficiency. This also improved gross indicated thermal efficiency (gITE) from 51.1% to 51.8% in a 9 bar indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) RCCI combustion case.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Piston profiles at TDC describing definitions of key dimensions (top: stock piston; bottom: piston with 6 mm chamfer)

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Fig. 2

Computational grids at TDC (top: stock piston; bottom: piston with 6 mm chamfer)

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Fig. 3

Validation of HCCI combustion cases in Table 3

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Fig. 4

Validation of UHC emission predictions

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Fig. 5

Validation of CO emission predictions

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Fig. 6

UHC emission trend with varying chamfer size

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Fig. 7

CO emission trend with varying chamfer size

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Fig. 8

Location of UHC emission of case 3 (left: stock piston; right: piston with 6 mm chamfer)

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Fig. 9

Temperature distribution of case 3 at −10 deg ATDC (left: stock piston; right: piston with 6 mm chamfer)

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Fig. 10

Pressure and AHRR of HCCI case 2 with varying chamfer size

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Fig. 11

Pressure and AHRR of HCCI case 2 with varying chamfer size

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Fig. 12

Pressure and AHRR of HCCI case 3 with varying chamfer size

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Fig. 13

Location of CO emission of case 3 (left: stock piston; right: piston with 6 mm chamfer)

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Fig. 14

Pressure and AHRR of the RCCI

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Fig. 15

Combustion chamber profile at TDC with the squish space highlighted (top: stock piston; bottom: piston with 6 mm chamfer)

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Fig. 16

Pressure and AHRR of different n-heptane 1 mass and chamfer sizes

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Fig. 17

UHC of RCCI case with n-heptane mass: 9.2 mg (left: stock piston; right: piston with 6 mm chamfer)

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Fig. 18

CO of RCCI case with n-heptane mass: 9.2 mg (left: stock piston; right: piston with 6 mm chamfer)

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Fig. 19

UHC and CO emission trend with varying chamfer size

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