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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Turbomachinery

Estimation of the Particle Deposition on a Transonic Axial Compressor Blade

[+] Author and Article Information
Alessio Suman

Dipartimento di Ingegneria,
Università degli Studi di Ferrara,
Ferrara 44122, Italy

Mirko Morini

Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale,
Università degli Studi di Parma,
Parma 43121, Italy

Rainer Kurz

Solar Turbines Incorporated,
San Diego, CA 92123

Nicola Aldi, Michele Pinelli, Pier Ruggero Spina

Dipartimento di Ingegneria,
Università degli Studi di Ferrara,
Ferrara 44122, Italy

Klaus Brun

Southwest Research Institute,
San Antonio, TX 78228

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Turbomachinery Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received July 15, 2015; final manuscript received July 22, 2015; published online August 25, 2015. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 138(1), 012604 (Aug 25, 2015) (10 pages) Paper No: GTP-15-1315; doi: 10.1115/1.4031206 History: Received July 15, 2015; Revised July 22, 2015

Solid particle ingestion is one of the principal degradation mechanisms in the compressor section of heavy-duty gas turbines. Usually, foulants in the ppm range, not captured by the air filtration system, i.e., (0–2) μm cause deposits on blading and result in a severe performance drop of the compressor. It is of great interest to the industry to determine which areas of the compressor airfoils are interested by these contaminants as a function of the location of the power unit. The aim of this work is the estimation of the actual deposits on the blade surface in terms of location and quantity. The size of the particles, their concentrations, and the filtration efficiency are specified in order to perform a realistic quantitative analysis of the fouling phenomena in an axial compressor. This study combines, for the first time, the impact/adhesion characteristic of the particles obtained through a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and the real size distribution of the contaminants in the air swallowed by the compressor. The blade zones affected by the deposits are clearly reported by using easy-to-use contaminant maps realized on the blade surface in terms of contaminant mass. The analysis showed that particular fluid-dynamic phenomena such as separation, shock waves, and tip leakage vortex strongly influence the pattern deposition. The combination of the smaller particles (0.15 μm) and the larger ones (1.50 μm) determines the highest amounts of deposits on the leading edge (LE) of the compressor airfoil. From these analyses, some guidelines for proper installation and management of the power plant (in terms of filtration systems and washing strategies) can be drawn.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

SEM micrographs of size-segregated particles: (b) fine particles, (c) ultrafine particles, (d) soot aggregates, and (e) fly ash [7]

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Fig. 2

Mass concentrations of size-segregated particles collected in the Shanghai atmosphere [7]

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Fig. 3

Mass concentrations of size-segregated particles collected in the Xuanwei atmosphere [8]

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Fig. 4

Combination of filtration mechanisms to obtain filter efficiency at various particle sizes [9]

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Fig. 5

Subdivision of the blade surface: 11 strips with its correspondent average value of the blade span and 12 slices

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Fig. 6

Contaminant mass on the blade surface without filtration system

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Fig. 7

Contaminant mass on the PS without filtration system

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Fig. 8

Contaminant mass on the SS without filtration system

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Fig. 9

Contaminant mass on the blade surface with filtration system

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Fig. 10

Contaminant mass on the PS with filtration system

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Fig. 11

Contaminant mass on the SS with filtration system

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Fig. 12

Overall deposits on the blade surface without filtration system

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Fig. 13

Overall deposits on the blade surface: IS and PC

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Fig. 14

Overall deposits on the blade surface: IS and OC

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Fig. 15

Overall deposits on the blade surface IW and OC

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Fig. 16

Deposits pattern on the SS: (a) IS without filtration system, IS with PC and IS with OC and (b) IW with OC

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Fig. 17

DI versus particle diameter

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