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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Turbomachinery

Recoverable Versus Unrecoverable Degradations of Gas Turbines Employed in Five Natural Gas Compressor Stations

[+] Author and Article Information
K. K. Botros

NOVA Chemicals,
Centre for Applied Research,
Calgary, AB T2E 7K7, Canada
e-mail: Kamal.botros@novachem.com

C. Hartloper

NOVA Chemicals,
Centre for Applied Research,
Calgary, AB T2E 7K7, Canada
e-mail: Colin.hartloper@novachem.com

H. Golshan

TransCanada Pipelines Limited,
Calgary, AB T2P 5H1, Canada
e-mail: hossein_golshan@transcanada.com

D. Rogers

TransCanada Pipelines Limited,
Calgary, AB T2P 5H1, Canada
e-mail: david_rogers@transcanada.com

Contributed by the Turbomachinery Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received July 16, 2015; final manuscript received July 25, 2015; published online September 1, 2015. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 138(2), 022602 (Sep 01, 2015) (10 pages) Paper No: GTP-15-1335; doi: 10.1115/1.4031263 History: Received July 16, 2015

Gas turbines (GT), like other prime movers, experience wear and tear over time, resulting in decreases in available power and efficiency. Further decreases in power and efficiency can result from erosion and fouling caused by the airborne impurities the engine breathes in. To counteract these decreases in power and efficiency, it is a standard procedure to “wash” the engine from time to time. In compressor stations on gas transmission systems, engine washes are performed off-line and are scheduled in such intervals to optimize the maintenance procedure. This optimization requires accurate prediction of the performance degradation of the engine over time. A previous paper demonstrated a methodology for evaluating various components of the GT gas path, in particular, the air compressor side of the engine since it is most prone to fouling and degradation. This methodology combines gas path analysis (GPA) to evaluate the thermodynamic parameters over the engine cycle followed by parameter estimation based on the Bayesian error-in-variable model (EVM) to filter the data of possible noise due to measurement errors. The methodology quantifies the engine-performance degradation over time, and indicates the effectiveness of each engine wash. In the present paper, the methodology was extended to assess both recoverable and unrecoverable degradations of five GT engines employed on TransCanada's pipeline system in Canada. These engines are: three GE LM2500+, one RR RB211-24G, and one GE LM1600 GTs. Hourly data were collected over the past 4 years, and engine health parameters were extracted to delineate the respective engine degradations. The impacts of engine loading, site air quality conditions, and site elevation on engine-air-compressor isentropic efficiency are compared between the five engines.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic representation of a GT engine, with engine and health parameters identified

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Fig. 2

Contour map of engine air compressor isentropic efficiency changes before and after each event of the RB211-24G engine employed at station #1

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Fig. 3

Typical axial compressor characteristic map [16]

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Fig. 4

Engine-air-compressor isentropic efficiency of RB211-24G at station #1 versus time for N1,corrected = 6426 rpm, 6351 rpm, and 6276 rpm, from top to bottom

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Fig. 5

Contour map of engine air compressor isentropic efficiency changes before and after each event of the LM2500+ engine employed at station #2

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Fig. 6

Engine-air-compressor isentropic efficiency of LM2500+ at station #2 versus time for N1,corrected = 9669 rpm, 9594 rpm, and 9519 rpm, from top to bottom

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Fig. 7

Contour map of engine air compressor isentropic efficiency changes before and after each event of the LM2500+ engine employed at station #3

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Fig. 8

Engine-air-compressor isentropic efficiency of LM2500+ at station #3 versus time for N1,corrected = 9115 rpm, 9315 rpm, 9515 rpm, 9715 rpm, and 9915 rpm, from top to bottom

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Fig. 9

Contour map of engine air compressor isentropic efficiency changes before and after each event of the LM2500+ engine employed at station #4

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Fig. 10

Engine-air-compressor isentropic efficiency of LM2500+ at station #4 versus time for N1,corrected = 9180 rpm, 9330 rpm, 9480 rpm, 9630 rpm, and 9780 rpm, from top to bottom

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Fig. 11

Contour map of engine air compressor isentropic efficiency changes before and after each event of the LM1600 engine employed at station #5

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Fig. 12

Engine-air-compressor isentropic efficiency of LM1600 at station #5 versus time for N1,corrected = 12,530 rpm, 12,630 rpm, 12,730 rpm, 12,830 rpm, and 12,930 rpm, from top to bottom

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