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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Structures and Dynamics

Coupled Aerothermal Modeling of a Rotating Cavity With Radial Inflow

[+] Author and Article Information
Zixiang Sun

Thermo-Fluid Systems UTC,
Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences,
University of Surrey,
Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH, UK
e-mail: Zixiang.Sun@surrey.ac.uk

Dario Amirante

Thermo-Fluid Systems UTC,
Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences,
University of Surrey,
Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH, UK
e-mail: D.Amirante@surrey.ac.uk

John W. Chew

Thermo-Fluid Systems UTC,
Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences,
University of Surrey,
Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH, UK
e-mail: J.Chew@surrey.ac.uk

Nicholas J. Hills

Thermo-Fluid Systems UTC,
Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences,
University of Surrey,
Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH, UK
e-mail: N.Hills@surrey.ac.uk

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Structures and Dynamics Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received July 14, 2015; final manuscript received July 31, 2015; published online October 6, 2015. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 138(3), 032505 (Oct 06, 2015) (11 pages) Paper No: GTP-15-1298; doi: 10.1115/1.4031387 History: Received July 14, 2015; Revised July 31, 2015

Flow and heat transfer in an aero-engine compressor disk cavity with radial inflow has been studied using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), large eddy simulation (LES), and coupled fluid/solid modeling. Standalone CFD investigations were conducted using a set of popular turbulence models along with 0.2 deg axisymmetric and a 22.5 deg discrete sector CFD models. The overall agreement between the CFD predictions is good, and solutions are comparable to an established integral method solution in the major part of the cavity. The LES simulation demonstrates that flow unsteadiness in the cavity due to the unstable thermal stratification is largely suppressed by the radial inflow. Steady flow CFD modeling using the axisymmetric sector model and the Spalart–Allmaras turbulence model was coupled with a finite element (FE) thermal model of the rotating cavity. Good agreement was obtained between the coupled solution and rig test data in terms of metal temperature. Analysis confirms that using a small radial bleed flow in compressor cavities is effective in reducing thermal response times for the compressor disks and that this could be applied in management of compressor blade clearance.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic diagram of flow in rotating cavity with radial inflow

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Fig. 2

Sectional view of the test rig

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Fig. 3

The transient cycle

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Fig. 4

The axisymmetric FE model and CFD domain

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Fig. 5

Flow features associated with radial inflow, MTO-3, 22.5 deg sector, hydra, SA, y+ ∼ 1

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Fig. 6

Comparison of swirl ratio between the sector models, the midaxial plane, MTO-3

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Fig. 7

Comparison of swirl ratio and radial velocity at three radial positions, MTO-3

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Fig. 8

Comparison of swirl ratio between turbulence models, the axial midplane, MTO-3

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Fig. 9

Instantaneous fluid temperature on periodic and midaxial planes, LES, MTO-3 condition

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Fig. 10

Typical metal temperature histories, TK at MP20, r/b = 0.653, MTO-3

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Fig. 11

Comparison of disk temperature, disk-3, MTO-3 condition

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Fig. 12

Comparison of shroud temperature, MTO-3 condition

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Fig. 13

Comparison of hub temperature, MTO-3 condition

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Fig. 14

Distributions of heat flux and Nusselt number on the RHS surface of disk-3, MTO-3

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Fig. 15

Transient disk metal histories, the integral method solution coupled with a “thin disk” model, MTO-3 condition

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