0
Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Combustion, Fuels, and Emissions

Evaluation of Two Measurement Techniques to Quantify Fuel–Air Mixing of a Gas Turbine Premixer at Atmospheric Conditions

[+] Author and Article Information
Wessam Estefanos

Department of Aerospace Engineering and
Engineering Mechanics,
University of Cincinnati,
Cincinnati, OH 45221
e-mail: estefaws@mail.uc.edu

Mahmoud Hamza

Department of Aerospace Engineering and
Engineering Mechanics,
University of Cincinnati,
Cincinnati, OH 45221
e-mail: hamzami@mail.uc.edu

Umesh Bhayaraju

Department of Aerospace Engineering and
Engineering Mechanics,
University of Cincinnati,
Cincinnati, OH 45221
e-mail: bhayaruh@ucmail.uc.edu

San-Mou Jeng

Department of Aerospace Engineering and
Engineering Mechanics,
University of Cincinnati,
Cincinnati, OH 45221
e-mail: jengsu@ucmail.uc.edu

Contributed by the Combustion and Fuels Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received July 13, 2015; final manuscript received August 31, 2015; published online October 27, 2015. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 138(5), 051501 (Oct 27, 2015) (9 pages) Paper No: GTP-15-1265; doi: 10.1115/1.4031528 History: Received July 13, 2015; Revised August 31, 2015

In the present study, two measurement techniques are adopted to evaluate the fuel–air mixing under atmospheric conditions using an industrial fuel–air premixer. These techniques are CO2 mixing and planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) in water. In these techniques, CO2 and fluorescent dye are injected as fuel simulants. CO2 measurements are used to validate PLIF in water. In the CO2 technique, CO2 concentrations are converted to fuel mass fractions, whereas in the PLIF technique, a modified post processing method is used to convert the LIF signal into fuel mass fraction. The experiments are conducted at the same Reynolds number and momentum flux ratio for two injection strategies. To study the effect of the flow aerodynamics on the mixing results, high-speed particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements are conducted in water at the same Reynolds number. A comparison of fuel concentrations measured with the CO2 and PLIF techniques shows good quantitative agreement at all momentum flux ratios. However, deviations between the two techniques are observed at locations of high fuel concentration gradients. The unsteady mixing is evaluated using the PLIF technique with high temporal resolution. Analysis of PIV and PLIF data shows that unsteady mixing is lower at regions of high fluctuations in velocity. Moreover, it is found that there is high unsteady mixing at locations of high concentration gradient.

Copyright © 2016 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Schematic of the premixer

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Water test rig assembly

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Test facility for PLIF in water measurements

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Test facility for CO2 measurements

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Normalized rms velocity profiles

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Normalized rms velocity contours

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Normalized mean axial velocity profiles

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Normalized mean axial velocity contours

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Normalized mean fuel mass fraction (PLIF in water)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Normalized mean fuel mass fraction (CO2 experiments)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Mean mass fraction profiles for CO2 and PLIF

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Normalized rms of fuel mass fraction (PLIF in water)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

Variation of Yrms with momentum flux ratio (PLIF)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 14

Comparison of Yrms and Urms at Z = 3 mm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 15

Normalized mean fuel mass fraction at Z = 3 mm (IS2)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 16

Normalized Yrms at Z = 3 mm (IS2)

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In