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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Turbomachinery

Undergraduate Project in Compressor Rig Design, Fabrication, and Testing for Complete Engineering Training

[+] Author and Article Information
Huu Duc Vo

Mem. ASME
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
École Polytechnique de Montréal,
2900 Boulevard Edouard-Montpetit,
2500 Chemin de Polytechnique,
Montreal, QC H3T 1J4, Canada
e-mail: huu-duc.vo@polymtl.ca

Jean-Yves Trépanier

Mem. ASME
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
École Polytechnique de Montréal,
2900 Boulevard Edouard-Montpetit,
2500 Chemin de Polytechnique,
Montreal, QC H3T 1J4, Canada
e-mail: jean-yves.trepanier@polymtl.ca

Contributed by the Education Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received July 26, 2015; final manuscript received August 31, 2015; published online November 3, 2015. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 138(5), 052604 (Nov 03, 2015) (13 pages) Paper No: GTP-15-1370; doi: 10.1115/1.4031544 History: Received July 26, 2015; Revised August 31, 2015

An ambitious project in propulsion was introduced as part of the final-year integrator project offerings of the mechanical and aerospace engineering programs at École Polytechnique de Montréal in 2011–2012. It has been running successfully for the past three academic years. The project consists in the design, fabrication, and placement into service of a functional instrumented multistage compressor test rig, including the compressor, for research in compressor aerodynamics. A team of 15–17 senior-year undergraduate engineering students is given a set of design and performance specifications and measurement requirements, an electric motor and drive, a data acquisition system, and some measurement probes. They must complete the project in two semesters with a budget on the order of Can$15,000. The compressor is made from rapid prototyping to keep production cost and time reasonable. However, the required rotation speed of 7200 rpm stretches the limits of the plastic material and presents the same structural challenges as industrial compressors running at higher speeds. The students are split into subteams according to the required disciplines, namely, compressor aerodynamics, general aerodynamics, structures, dynamics, mechanical design and integration, instrumentation, and project management. For the initial phase, which covers the first two months, the students receive short seminars from experts in academia and industry in each discipline and use the knowledge from fundamental engineering courses to analytically model the different components to come up with a preliminary design. In the second phase, covering three to six, the students are trained at commercial simulation tools and use them for detailed analysis to refine and finalize the design. In each of the first two phases, the students present their work in design reviews with a jury made up of engineers from industry and supervising professors. During the final phase, the compressor is built and tested with data acquisition and motor control programs written by the students. Finally, the students present their results with comparison of measured performance with numerical and analytical predictions from the first two phases and hand over their compressor rig with design and test reports as well as a user manual and an assembly/maintenance manual. This complete project allows the students to put into practice virtually all the courses of their undergraduate engineering curriculum while giving them an extensive taste of the rich and intellectually challenging environment of gas turbine and turbomachinery engineering.

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References

Crawley, E. F. , 1985, “ The CDIO Syllabus, A Statement of Goals for Undergraduate Engineering Education,” Worldwide CDIO Initiative, Gothenburg, Sweden, http://www.cdio.org/framework-benefits/cdio-syllabus
Mund, F. C. , Kalfas, A. I. , Abhari, R. S. , Turcan, Y. , Hourmouziadis, J. , Trébinjac, I. , and Vouillarmet, A. , 2003, “ A Multi-Component and Multi-Disciplinary Student Design Project Within an International Academic and Industrial Collaboration,” ASME Paper No. GT2003-38163.
Kyprianidis, K. G. , Grönstedt, T. , and Barbosa, J. R. , 2012, “ Lessons Learned From the Development of Courses on Gas Turbine Multi-Disciplinary Conceptual Design,” ASME Paper No. GT2012-70095.
Bruna, D. , Cravero, C. , Turner, M. , and Merchant, A. , 2007, “ An Educational Software Suite for Teaching Design Strategies for Multistage Axial Flow Compressors,” ASME Paper No. GT2007-27160.
Tomita, T. J. , and Barbosa, J. R. , 2012, “ Numerical Tools for High Performance Axial Compressor Design for Teaching Purpose,” ASME Paper No. GT2012-69987.
Tomita, T. J. , and Barbosa, J. R. , 2014, “ Experiences on Project-Based-Classes For Turbomachine Design in an Aerospace Engineering Undergraduate Program,” ASME Paper No. GT2014-26393.
Vo, H. D. , 2010, “ Rotating Stall Suppression in Axial Compressors With Casing Plasma Actuation,” AIAA J. Propul. Power, 26(4), pp. 808–818. [CrossRef]
Erler, E. , Vo, H. D. , and Yu, H. , 2015, “ Desensitization of Axial Compressor Performance and Stability to Tip Clearance Size,” ASME Paper No. GT2015-42746.
Greitzer, E. , 1976, “ Surge and Rotating Stall in Axial Flow Compressors—Part I: Theoretical Compression System Model,” ASME J. Eng. Power, 98(2), pp. 190–198. [CrossRef]
“  AER4855_201213_rig,” 2013, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal, Canada, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OeSGc-kUh2M
“  AER4855C_201213_Video_summary,” 2013, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal, Canada, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Kj5PCDsHZA
Ashrafi, F. , and Vo, H. D. , 2015, “ Delay of Rotating Stall in Compressors With Plasma Actuators,” ASME Paper No. GT2015-42559.

Figures

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Fig. 1

Two-stage 8-in. axial compressor test rig designed and built in the academic year 2011–2012

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Fig. 2

Two-stage 7–8.5 in. axial–centrifugal compressor test rig designed and built in the academic year 2012–2013

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Fig. 3

Two-stage 7–8.5 in. axial-mixed flow compressor test rig designed and built in the academic year 2013–2014

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Fig. 4

Elements of design requirements document provided to students for the 2012–2013 project

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Fig. 5

Diagram of interactions between disciplines

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Fig. 6

Control volume analysis for blade pressure force estimation

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Fig. 7

Beam approximation of blade from preliminary structural analysis

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Fig. 8

Preliminary dynamics analysis using blade modeling and Campbell diagram

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Fig. 9

Example of compressor rig design at preliminary design stage

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Fig. 10

Proposed instrumentation layout from the 2012–2013 project

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Fig. 11

Entropy contours at midspan for axial stage of the 2012–2013 compressor from CFD simulations with ansys cfx

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Fig. 12

Velocity contours at a meridional cut for bellmouth of the 2012–2013 compressor from CFD simulations with ansys fluent

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Fig. 13

Von Mises stress contours on impeller of the 2012–2013 compressor from FEM simulations with ansys

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Fig. 14

Displacement contours on impeller of the 2012–2013 compressor from FEM simulations with ansys

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Fig. 15

Displacement contours and natural frequencies for first-order bending and torsion mode for axial rotor of the 2012–2013 compressor from FEM simulations with ansys

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Fig. 16

Displacement contours and natural frequencies for first- and second-order shaft bending modes for the 2012–2013 compressor from FEM simulations with ansys

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Fig. 17

Exploded view of main components for the 2012–2013 compressor rig

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Fig. 18

Final design of 2D traverse system for Kiel total pressure probe on the 2013–2014 compressor rig

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Fig. 19

Data acquisition structure for compressor rig

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Fig. 20

Assembly of the 2012–2013 compressor rig

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Fig. 21

Comparison of experimental versus predicted total pressure rise characteristics (speedline)

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Fig. 22

Group pictures at delivery of the 2011–2012 (top), 2012–2013 (middle), and 2013–2014 (bottom) compressor rigs following final presentation

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Fig. 23

Sample of user manual and assembly/maintenance manual for the 2012–2013 compressor rig

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Fig. 24

Axial rotor and stator of the 2013–2014 compressor rig produced by SLA 3D printing

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