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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Combustion, Fuels, and Emissions

NOx Emissions Modeling and Uncertainty From Exhaust-Gas-Diluted Flames

[+] Author and Article Information
Antonio C. A. Lipardi

Alternative Fuels Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
McGill University,
Montréal, QC H3A OC3, Canada
e-mail: antonio.lipardi@mail.mcgill.ca

Jeffrey M. Bergthorson

Associate Professor
Alternative Fuels Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
McGill University,
Montréal, QC H3A OC3, Canada
e-mail: jeff.bergthorson@mcgill.ca

Gilles Bourque

Siemens Canada,
Power Generation, Distributed Generation,
Montréal, QC H9P 1A5, Canada
e-mail: gilles.bourque@siemens.com

Contributed by the Combustion and Fuels Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received July 13, 2015; final manuscript received September 14, 2015; published online November 3, 2015. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 138(5), 051506 (Nov 03, 2015) (10 pages) Paper No: GTP-15-1269; doi: 10.1115/1.4031603 History: Received July 13, 2015; Revised September 14, 2015

Oxides of nitrogen (NOx) are pollutants emitted by combustion processes during power generation and transportation that are subject to increasingly stringent regulations due to their impact on human health and the environment. One NOx reduction technology being investigated for gas-turbine engines is exhaust-gas recirculation (EGR), either through external exhaust-gas recycling or staged combustion. In this study, the effects of different percentages of EGR on NOx production will be investigated for methane–air and propane–air flames at a selected adiabatic flame temperature of 1800 K. The variability and uncertainty of the results obtained by the gri-mech 3.0 (GRI), San-Diego 2005 (SD), and the CSE thermochemical mechanisms are assessed. It was found that key parameters associated with postflame NO emissions can vary up to 192% for peak CH values, 35% for thermal NO production rate, and 81% for flame speed, depending on the mechanism used for the simulation. A linear uncertainty analysis, including both kinetic and thermodynamic parameters, demonstrates that simulated postflame nitric oxide levels have uncertainties on the order of ±50–60%. The high variability of model predictions, and their relatively high associated uncertainties, motivates future experiments of NOx formation in exhaust-gas-diluted flames under engine-relevant conditions to improve and validate combustion and NOx design tools.

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References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Equivalence ratio as a function of EGR dilution producing a constant flame temperature of 1800 K

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Fig. 1

Equilibrium solver diagram

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Fig. 3

NO profile as a function of time from the flame front for: GRI (top), SD (middle), and CSE (bottom) with varying EGR dilution for CH4 oxidation at a constant flame temperature of 1800 K

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Fig. 4

NO profile as a function of time from the flame front for the EGR dilution cases: baseline (top), midlevel (middle), and max-level (bottom) for CH4 oxidation at a constant flame temperature of 1800 K

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Fig. 5

NO profile as a function of time from the flame front for the EGR dilution cases: baseline (top), midlevel (middle), and max-level (bottom) for C3H8 oxidation at a constant flame temperature of 1800 K (same legend as in Fig. 4)

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Fig. 6

NO profile (with uncertainty area) as a function of time from the flame front for the CH4 baseline case assessed for GRI (top), SD (middle), and CSE (bottom)

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Fig. 7

Postflame NO normalized sensitivities relative to the kinetic (top) and thermodynamic (bottom) parameters taken at 8 ms downstream of the flame location

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Fig. 8

Highest kinetic (top)/thermodynamic (bottom) contributors to postflame NO uncertainty taken at 8 ms downstream of the flame location (same legend as in Fig. 7)

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