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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Combustion, Fuels, and Emissions

Combustion Characteristics of Stratified Mixture in Lean-Burn Liquefied Petroleum Gas Direct-Injection Engine With Spray-Guided Combustion System

[+] Author and Article Information
Cheolwoong Park

Department of Engine Research,
Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials,
Daejeon 34103, South Korea
e-mail: cwpark@kimm.re.kr

Seungmook Oh

Department of Engine Research,
Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials,
Daejeon 34103, South Korea
e-mail: mook@kimm.re.kr

Taeyoung Kim

Department of Engine Research,
Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials,
Daejeon 34103, South Korea
e-mail: taeyoungkim@kimm.re.kr

Heechang Oh

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Korea Advanced Institute of
Science and Technology,
Daejeon 34141, South Korea
e-mail: hcoo@kaist.ac.kr

Choongsik Bae

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Korea Advanced Institute of
Science and Technology,
Daejeon 34141, South Korea
e-mail: csbae@kaist.ac.kr

Contributed by the Combustion and Fuels Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received September 22, 2015; final manuscript received October 12, 2015; published online December 4, 2015. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 138(7), 071501 (Dec 04, 2015) (7 pages) Paper No: GTP-15-1456; doi: 10.1115/1.4031876 History: Received September 22, 2015; Revised October 12, 2015; Accepted October 13, 2015

Today, we are faced with the problems of global warming and fossil fuel depletion, and they have led to the enforcement of new emissions regulations. Direct-injection spark-ignition engines are a very promising technology that can comply with the new regulations. These engines offer the advantages of better fuel economy and lower emissions than conventional port-injection engines. The use of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) as the fuel reduces carbon emissions because of its vaporization characteristics and the fact that it has lower carbon content than gasoline. An experimental study was carried out to investigate the combustion process and emission characteristics of a 2 l spray-guided LPG direct-injection engine under lean operating conditions. The engine was operated at a constant speed of 2000 rpm under 0.2 MPa brake mean effective pressure (BMEP), which corresponds to a common operation point of a passenger vehicle. Combustion stability, which is the most important component of engine performance, is closely related to the operation strategy and it significantly influences the degree of fuel consumption reduction. In order to achieve stable combustion with a stratified LPG mixture, an interinjection spark ignition (ISI) strategy, which is an alternative control strategy to two-stage injection, was employed. The effects of the compression ratio on fuel economy were also assessed; due to the characteristics of the stratified LPG mixture, the fuel consumption did not reduce when the compression ratio was increased.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic diagram of the experimental setup for Mie-scattering images

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Fig. 2

Schematic diagram of the experimental apparatus

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Fig. 3

Effects of excess air ratio and fuel-injection pressure on BSFC and combustion stability

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Fig. 4

Effects of fuel-injection pressure on pressure trace and heat release rate under stoichiometric mixture conditions

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Fig. 5

Effects of fuel-injection pressure on pressure trace and heat release rates under stratified lean mixture conditions

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Fig. 6

Effects of fuel-injection pressure on spray pattern at an ambient pressure of 0.5 MPa and 400 μs after the start of injection

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Fig. 7

Effects of fuel-injection and spark advance timing on pressure trace and heat release rate for a stratified lean mixture

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Fig. 8

Effects of ambient pressure on spray pattern of LPG at fuel-injection pressure of 20 MPa and 400 μs after the start of injection

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Fig. 9

Visualization of spray with multiple injections at a fuel-injection pressure of 20 MPa

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Fig. 10

Comparison of BSFC, excess air ratio, and combustion stability for single-injection, two-stage injection, and ISI strategies

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Fig. 11

Comparison of pressure trace and heat release rate for single-injection, two-stage injection, and ISI strategies

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Fig. 12

Effects of compression ratio on pressure trace and heat release rate under stratified lean mixture condition

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Fig. 13

Comparison of combustion characteristics according to each strategy based on single injection strategy

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