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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Structures and Dynamics

Development and Validation of a Three-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis for Journal Bearings Considering Cavitation and Conjugate Heat Transfer

[+] Author and Article Information
Yin Song

Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power
Engineering of Ministry of Education,
Department of Thermal Engineering,
Tsinghua University,
Beijing 100084, China
e-mail: songyin@tsinghua.edu.cn

Chun-wei Gu

Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power
Engineering of Ministry of Education,
Department of Thermal Engineering,
Tsinghua University,
Beijing 100084, China
e-mail: gcw@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Structures and Dynamics Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received June 10, 2014; final manuscript received April 30, 2015; published online June 9, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Jerzy T. Sawicki.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 137(12), 122502 (Jun 09, 2015) (10 pages) Paper No: GTP-14-1277; doi: 10.1115/1.4030633 History: Received June 10, 2014

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis, which solves the full three-dimensional (3D) Navier–Stokes equations, has been recognized as having promise in providing a more detailed and accurate analysis for oil-film journal bearings than the traditional Reynolds analysis, although there are still challenging issues requiring further investigation, such as the modeling of cavitation and the modeling of conjugate heat transfer effects in the CFD analysis of bearings. In this paper, a 3D CFD method for the analysis of journal bearings considering the above two effects has been developed; it employs three different cavitation models, including the Half-Sommerfeld model, a vaporous cavitation model, and a gaseous cavitation model. The method has been used to analyze a two-groove journal bearing and the results are validated with experimental measurements and the traditional Reynolds solutions. It is found that the CFD method which considers the conjugate heat transfer and employs the gaseous cavitation model gives better predictions of both bearing load and temperature than either the traditional Reynolds solution or CFD with other cavitation models. The CFD results also show strong recirculation of the fresh oil in the grooves, which has been neglected in the traditional Reynolds solution. The above results show conclusively that the present 3D CFD method considering the conjugate heat transfer and employing the gaseous cavitation model provides an efficient tool for more detailed and accurate analysis for bearing performance.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Calculation domain

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Fig. 2

Mesh for the fluid domain

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Fig. 3

Mesh for the solid domain

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Fig. 4

Circumferential temperature profiles calculated by different meshes

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Fig. 5

Definition of the circumferential coordinates

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Fig. 6

Measured and calculated circumferential profiles for the bearing wall temperature (case 1)

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Fig. 7

Distributions of void fraction predicted by CFD (a) HS, (b) vapor, and (c) gaseous

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Fig. 8

Distributions of bearing temperature predicted by CFD (a) HS, (b) vapor, and (c) gaseous

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Fig. 9

Calculated circumferential profiles for the oil-film pressure (case 1)

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Fig. 10

Measured and calculated circumferential profiles for the bearing wall temperature (case 2)

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Fig. 11

Measured and calculated circumferential profiles for the oil-film pressure (case 3)

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Fig. 12

Streamlines in the oil feeding grooves: (a) the left groove at 180 deg and (b) the right groove at 0 deg

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Fig. 13

Oil temperature in the middle section of oil feeding grooves: (a) the left groove at 180 deg and (b) the right groove at 0 deg

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