0
Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Combustion, Fuels, and Emissions

Fundamental Combustion Characteristics of Lean and Stoichiometric Hydrogen Laminar Premixed Flames Diluted With Nitrogen or Carbon Dioxide

[+] Author and Article Information
Hong-Meng Li, Zuo-Yu Sun, Zi-Hang Zhou, Yuan Li, Ye Yuan

School of Mechanical, Electronic and
Control Engineering,
Beijing Jiaotong University,
Beijing 100044, China

Guo-Xiu Li

School of Mechanical, Electronic and
Control Engineering,
Beijing Jiaotong University,
Beijing 100044, China
e-mail: Li_GuoXiu@yahoo.com

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Combustion and Fuels Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received July 8, 2015; final manuscript received October 22, 2015; published online May 24, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Song-Charng Kong.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 138(11), 111501 (May 24, 2016) (9 pages) Paper No: GTP-15-1241; doi: 10.1115/1.4032315 History: Received July 08, 2015; Revised October 22, 2015

In this work, the laminar combustion characteristics of H2/N2/air (H2/CO2/air) were systematically investigated under different hydrogen ratios (40–100%) and equivalence ratios (0.4–1.0) in a closed combustion vessel using the spherical expanding flame method associated with Schlieren technology. The unstretched laminar burning velocities were compared with data from previous study, and the result indicates that excellent agreements are obtained. Numerical simulations were also conducted using GRI3.0 and USC II mechanisms to compare with the present experimental results. The Markstein length for H2/inert gas can be decreased by decreasing the equivalence ratio and hydrogen ratio. The results indicate that the H2/inert gas premixed flames tend to be more unstable with the decrease of equivalence ratio and hydrogen ratio. For H2/N2 mixture, the suppression effect on laminar burning velocity is caused by modified specific heat of mixtures and decreased heat release, which result in a decreased flame temperature. For H2/CO2 mixture, the carbon dioxide has stronger dilution effect than nitrogen in reducing laminar burning velocity owing to both thermal effect and chemical effect.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2016 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Schematic diagram of the experimental rig employed in the present investigation

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Comparison of the laminar burning velocity of H2–air mixtures to the experimental datasets from literature

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Variation regulation of the global stretch rate of hydrogen laminar premixed flames: (a) with a H2 ratio of 80% in different equivalence ratios and (b) with different H2 ratios in an equivalence ratio of 0.6

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Nexus between the propagation speed and the global stretch rate of hydrogen laminar premixed flames: (a) with a H2 ratio of 50% in different equivalence ratios and (b) with different H2 ratios in an equivalence ratio of 0.5

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Nexus between the Markstein length an equivalence ratio with different H2 ratios: (a) diluted by N2 and (b) diluted by CO2

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

The laminar burning velocity with different H2 ratios and different equivalence ratios: (a) diluted by N2 and (b) diluted by CO2

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Comparison of the experimental data with simulation results of H2/N2 premixed flames: (a) φ = 0.7, (b) φ = 0.8, (c) φ = 0.9, and (d) φ = 1.0

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Comparison of the experimental data with simulation results of H2/CO2 premixed flames: (a) φ = 0.7, (b) φ = 0.8, (c) φ = 0.9, and (d) φ = 1.0

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Adiabatic flame temperature and laminar burning velocity versus hydrogen ratio of H2/N2 mixture and H2/CO2 mixture at φ = 1.0

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In