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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Microturbines and Small Turbomachinery

Influences of Design Parameters on a Double Serpentine Convergent Nozzle

[+] Author and Article Information
Xiao-lin Sun

School of Power and Energy,
Collaborative Innovation Center for
Advanced Aero-Engine,
Northwestern Polytechnical University,
Xi'an 710072, China
e-mail: monkeyking_xiaolin@163.com

Zhan-xue Wang

Professor
School of Power and Energy,
Collaborative Innovation Center for
Advanced Aero-Engine,
Northwestern Polytechnical University,
Xi'an 710072, China
e-mail: wangzx@nwpu.edu.cn

Li Zhou

Professor
School of Power and Energy,
Collaborative Innovation Center for
Advanced Aero-Engine,
Northwestern Polytechnical University,
Xi'an 710072, China
e-mail: zhouli@nwpu.edu.cn

Zeng-wen Liu

Associate Professor
School of Power and Energy,
Collaborative Innovation Center for
Advanced Aero-Engine,
Northwestern Polytechnical University,
Xi'an 710072, China
e-mail: liuzw@nwpu.eud.cn

Jing-wei Shi

School of Power and Energy,
Collaborative Innovation Center for
Advanced Aero-Engine,
Northwestern Polytechnical University,
Xi'an 710072, China
e-mail: shijingwei@mail.nwpu.edu.cn

Contributed by the Turbomachinery Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received June 14, 2015; final manuscript received November 12, 2015; published online February 17, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Eric Petersen.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 138(7), 072301 (Feb 17, 2016) (16 pages) Paper No: GTP-15-1205; doi: 10.1115/1.4032338 History: Received June 14, 2015; Revised November 12, 2015

Serpentine nozzles are supplied in stealth bombers and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) to evidently suppress the infrared radiation signatures (IRSs) emitted by engine exhausts. It is commonly known that excessive geometric parameters are included in the double serpentine nozzle design and, as a result, the aim of this paper is to study the influences of the design parameters on the performance of double serpentine nozzle. To this end, the design method of the serpentine nozzle was concisely introduced, and the qualifications to completely shield turbine were given. Simulations using six different turbulence models were conducted and compared to the experimental data in order to determine the suitable turbulence model for serpentine duct simulations. Then, the effects of geometric design parameters at the first serpentine paragraph exit (the dimensionless width of W1/D, area of A1/Ain, and offset distance of ΔY1/L1) on the flowfield, and the performance of double serpentine nozzle was investigated numerically. The validation study shows that the simulations with shear-stress transport (SST) κ–ω turbulence model adopted can accurately predict the flux rate, the axial thrust, and the static pressure of the experimental nozzle, and therefore, SST κ–ω turbulence model is the most suitable turbulence model in the selected six turbulence models to be used for the simulation of the double serpentine nozzles. The numerical results show that friction loss increases with the increment of W1/D due to the increased wetted perimeter, but small value of W1/D would lead to large secondary flow loss; even the shock loss appears because of the steep curvature of the second turning. Small area of the first serpentine duct A1/Ain induces high flow velocity in the first duct, which corresponds to large friction loss. Steep offset distance of the first serpentine duct ΔY1/L1 induces high local losses. As the geometric design parameters of the double serpentine nozzle interact mutually with the qualifications to completely shield the turbine, the range of design parameters should be synthetically chosen during the design progress. Thus, the width of the first serpentine duct W1/D is recommended to be from 1.0 to 1.3. The area of the first serpentine duct A1/Ain should be as large as possible, and the offset distance of the first serpentine ΔY1/L1 should be small in the permission range of the design parameters.

Copyright © 2016 by ASME
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References

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Figures

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Fig. 6

Pressure tap locations on the upper, down, and side wall

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Fig. 5

Experimental setup

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Fig. 4

The qualifications of completely shield turbine

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Fig. 3

Design parameters of double serpentine nozzle

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Fig. 2

Single and double serpentine nozzle

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Fig. 1

Nozzle contours characterized by centerline and alterable sections

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Fig. 7

Boundary conditions

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Fig. 8

Computational grid: (a) global computational grid and (b) nozzle inlet and wall grids

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Fig. 9

Static pressure distributions on the upper and down wall under three grid sizes

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Fig. 10

Comparisons of (a) flux rates and (b) axial thrust

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Fig. 11

Comparisons of relative errors of the flux rates (a) and the axial thrust (b)

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Fig. 12

Comparisons of static pressure distributions on the upper wall and down wall (a) and side wall (b)

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Fig. 13

Comparisons of relative errors on the upper wall (a), down wall (b), and side wall (c)

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Fig. 18

Streamline distributions of model 1 at NPR = 1.6

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Fig. 19

Comparisons of the inner wall friction loss for the nozzle with different W1/D

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Fig. 20

Ma distributions on the symmetric plane

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Fig. 21

Comparisons of the thrust loss induced by other losses for the nozzle with different W1/D

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Fig. 22

The double serpentine nozzle models with different A1/Ain

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Fig. 23

The curvature radii of the centerlines for the nozzle with different A1/Ain

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Fig. 14

The investigated parameters in this paper

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Fig. 15

The double serpentine nozzle models with different W1/D

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Fig. 16

The curvature radii of the centerlines for the nozzle with different W1/D

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Fig. 17

Comparisons of the performance parameters for the nozzle with different W1/D: (a) total pressure recovery coefficient δp, (b) flow coefficient CD, and (c) thrust coefficient Cfg

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Fig. 24

Comparisons of the performance parameters for the nozzle with different A1/Ain: (a) total pressure recovery coefficient δp, (b) flow coefficient CD, and (c) thrust coefficient Cfg

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Fig. 25

Comparisons of the inner wall friction for the nozzle with different A1/Ain

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Fig. 26

Ma distributions at the symmetric plane and the first serpentine paragraph exit

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Fig. 27

Wall shear stress distributions of the half wall for the nozzle with different A1/Ain

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Fig. 28

Comparisons of the thrust loss induced by other losses for the nozzle with different A1/Ain

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Fig. 29

Geometries of the four double serpentine nozzles with different ΔY1/L1

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Fig. 30

The curvature radii of centerlines for the nozzle with different ΔY1/L1

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Fig. 31

Comparisons of the performance parameters for the nozzle with different ΔY1/L1: (a) total pressure recovery coefficient δp, (b) flow coefficient CD, and (c) thrust coefficient Cfg

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Fig. 32

Comparisons of the inner wall friction for the nozzle with different ΔY1/L1

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Fig. 33

The wall shear stress of the half wall for the nozzle with different ΔY1/L1

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Fig. 34

Distributions of Ma on the symmetric plane

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Fig. 35

Distributions of the thrust loss induced by the local losses

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