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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Structures and Dynamics

A Continuum Damage Mechanics-Based Viscoplastic Model of Adapted Complexity for High-Temperature Creep–Fatigue Loading

[+] Author and Article Information
Weizhe Wang

Key Lab of Education Ministry for
Power Machinery and Engineering,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, China;
Gas Turbine Research Institute,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, China
e-mail: wangwz0214@sjtu.edu.cn

Patrick Buhl

Material Testing Institute (MPA),
University of Stuttgart,
Pfaffenwaldring 32,
Stuttgart D-70569, Germany
e-mail: Patrick.Buhl@mpa.uni-stuttgart.de

Andreas Klenk

Material Testing Institute (MPA),
University of Stuttgart,
Pfaffenwaldring 32,
Stuttgart D-70569, Germany
e-mail: Andreas.Klenk@mpa.uni-stuttgart.de

Yingzheng Liu

Key Lab of Education Ministry for
Power Machinery and Engineering,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, China;
Gas Turbine Research Institute,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, China
e-mail: yzliu@sjtu.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Structures and Dynamics Committee of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received May 10, 2015; final manuscript received December 19, 2015; published online March 22, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Herman Shen.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 138(9), 092501 (Mar 22, 2016) (10 pages) Paper No: GTP-15-1162; doi: 10.1115/1.4032679 History: Received May 10, 2015; Revised December 19, 2015

A continuum damage mechanics (CDM) based viscoplastic constitutive model is established in this study to describe the fully coupling of creep and fatigue behavior. The most significant improvement is the introduction of a continuum damage variable into the constitutive equations, instead of considering creep damage and fatigue damage separately. The CDM-based viscoplastic constitutive material model is implemented using a user-defined subroutine (UMAT). A standard specimen is used for carrying out uniaxial creep, fatigue, and creep–fatigue interaction tests to validate the material model. In addition, to further demonstrate the capability of the material model to predict the complex material behavior, a complex strain-control loading test is performed to validate the material model. The simulated and measured results are in good agreement at different temperatures and loadings, in particular for rapid cyclic softening behavior following crack initiation and propagation.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Comparison of creep strain results from model simulation and experiment

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Fig. 2

Tensile and compressive peak stresses for T = 550 °C and Δεctr  = 0.924%: (a) comparison of cyclic softening behavior and (b) simulated damage behavior

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Fig. 3

Tensile and compressive peak stresses for T = 600 °C and Δεctr  = 0.645%: (a) comparison of cyclic softening behavior and (b) simulated damage behavior

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Fig. 4

Tensile and compressive peak stresses for T = 625 °C and Δεctr  = 1.214%: (a) comparison of cyclic softening behavior and (b) simulated damage behavior

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Fig. 5

Comparison of the results from (a) the CNOWD model and (b) the CNOW model

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Fig. 6

Comparison of the first hysteresis loops for (a) T = 550 °C, Δεctr  = 0.924%; (b) T = 600 °C, Δεctr  = 0.645%; and (c) T = 625 °C, Δεctr  = 1.214%

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Fig. 7

Comparison of the hysteresis loops midway through the lifespan for (a) T = 550 °C, Δεctr  = 0.924%; (b) T = 600 °C, Δεctr  = 0.645%; and (c) T = 625 °C, Δεctr  = 1.214%

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Fig. 8

Evolution of the isotropic hardening variable R1

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Fig. 9

(a) Increase in damage for each cyclic loading, (b) increase in plastic strain range for each cyclic loading, and (c) contribution of the plastic strain range to the increase in damage for each cyclic loading

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Fig. 10

(a) Geometry of the hollow cylinder and (b) loading paths for additional force and inner pressure

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Fig. 11

Strain versus time for the multiaxial creep–fatigue test: (a) sample 10A33 and (b) sample 10A41

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Fig. 12

Normalized control of strain evolution

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Fig. 13

Comparison of the measured and simulated results for the complex loading sequence

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Fig. 14

(a) Evolution of fatigue damage and creep damage under the complex loading sequence and (b) evolution of fatigue damage and creep damage under the strain loadings shown in Fig. 12(a)

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