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Research Papers: Internal Combustion Engines

An Enhanced Primary Reference Fuel Mechanism Considering Conventional Fuel Chemistry in Engine Simulation

[+] Author and Article Information
Dezhi Zhou

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Faculty of Engineering,
National University of Singapore,
Singapore 117575, Singapore
e-mail: dezhizhou@u.nus.edu

Wenming Yang

Department of Mechanical Engineering
Faculty of Engineering
National University of Singapore,
Singapore 117575, Singapore
e-mail: mpeywm@nus.edu.sg

Hui An

Engineering Cluster,
Singapore Institute of Technology,
Singapore 138683, Singapore
e-mail: hui.an@singaporetech.edu.sg

Jing Li

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Faculty of Engineering,
National University of Singapore,
Singapore 117575, Singapore
e-mail: lijing@u.nus.edu

Markus Kraft

Cambridge CARES C4T,
62 Nanyang Drive,
NTU, SCBE,
Singapore 637459, Singapore
e-mail: mk306@cam.ac.uk

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the IC Engine Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING FOR GAS TURBINES AND POWER. Manuscript received January 27, 2016; final manuscript received January 29, 2016; published online March 22, 2016. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 138(9), 092804 (Mar 22, 2016) (8 pages) Paper No: GTP-16-1038; doi: 10.1115/1.4032713 History: Received January 27, 2016; Revised January 29, 2016

A compact and accurate primary reference fuel (PRF) mechanism which consists of 46 species and 144 reactions was developed and validated to consider the fuel chemistry in combustion simulation based on a homogeneous charged compression ignition (HCCI) mechanism. Some significant reactions were updated to ensure its capabilities for predicting combustion characteristics of PRFs. To better predict the laminar flame speed, the relevant C2–C3 carbon reactions were coupled in. This enhanced PRF mechanism was validated by available experimental data references including ignition delay times, laminar flame speed, premixed flame species concentrations in jet stirred reactor (JSR), rapid compression machine (RCM), and shock tube. The predicted data was calculated by chemkin-ii codes. All the comparisons between experimental and calculated data indicated high accuracy of this mechanism to capture combustion characteristics. Also, this mechanism was integrated into kiva4–chemkin. The engine simulation data (including in-cylinder pressure and apparent heat release rate (HRR)) was compared with experimental data in PRF HCCI, partially premixed compression ignition (PCCI), and diesel/gasoline dual-fuel engine combustion data. The comparison results implied that this mechanism could predict PRF and gasoline/diesel combustion in computational fluid dynamic (CFD) engine simulations. The overall results show this PRF mechanism could predict the conventional fuel combustion characteristics in engine simulation.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Comparisons of laminar flame speed between different experimental and calculated results (experimental results from Refs. [26,27,34,35]; chemical models from Refs. [4,5,7,9])

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Fig. 2

Measured [24] and predicted ignition delay of different PRF fuel mixtures; initial pressure 40 bar and equivalence ratio 1.0

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Fig. 3

Measured [24] and predicted ignition delay for (a) n-heptane and (b) iso-octane at different pressures; equivalence ratio 1.0

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Fig. 4

Measured [25] and predicted ignition delay for (a) n-heptane and (b) iso-octane at different equivalence ratios; initial pressure 40 bar

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Fig. 5

Measured [26] and predicted laminar flame speed of different PRF fuel mixtures; pressure 1 atm and temperature 298 K

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Fig. 6

Measured [27] and predicted laminar flame speed for (a) n-heptane and (b) iso-octane at different temperatures; pressure 1 atm

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Fig. 7

Measured [28] and predicted intermediate species evolution in (a) n-heptane and (b) iso-octane flame

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Fig. 9

Computational mesh for HCCI, PCCI, and RCCI engine combustion simulations (all shown at 0 deg ATDC)

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Fig. 10

Comparison between experiments [31,32] and simulations for PRF73 HCCI engine

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Fig. 8

Measured [29,30] and predicted intermediate species profile with different temperatures for (a) n-heptane; (b) PRF50; and (c) iso-octane. 0.1% fuel; equivalence ratio 1.0; residence time 1 s; pressure 10 atm

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Fig. 11

Comparison between experiments [33] and simulations for PRF25 PCCI engine

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Fig. 12

Comparison between experiments and simulations for gasoline/diesel dual-fuel engine

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